1943
A new destroyer honored John Burke, Valley City, killed in the South Pacific.
Men 38 to 45 told to get war jobs or be drafted.
Jaycees named Carl Osen, Carpenter Lumber manager, outstanding young man.
Willard Carlson was elected Civic Club president.
Shoes were rationed beginning February 9. Rationing of canned fruits and vegetables were announced.
Record of the 164th at Guadalcanal was praised by Secretary of War Stimson.
WAAC’s were trained at state colleges.
Grocers protested the high point value on canned goods.
Price ceilings were set on eggs.
The city council urged approval of the proposed Baldhill Dam.
Harry Gilbertson sold Barnes county Implement to R. E. Blenn, Valley City and Fred Sahrowsky, Dickinson.
Influenza hit the community with 55 absent from high school.
A $250,000 grant to update the city airport was approved.
General Dwight Eisenhower was named invasion chief.
1943 grain production was highest in North Dakota history.
Esquire magazine was banned from mails.
Willard and Clarence Carlson sold their Main Street café after 25 years of operation to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Bulland. The Carlson brothers continued to operate a real estate office.
Dr. J. F. L. Bohnhoff, Trinity Church pastor for 48 years, died.
Six hundred soldiers from a tank detachment lead a military parade here. The event marked the close of harvest work done by troops. Detachments of troops had shocked 5, 910 acres of grain in on five day period.
A Japanese suicide submarine was display here when a $375,000 War Bond campaign got underway. Over 2, 500 persons viewed the sub.
Grocery “ceiling prices” were posted in stores.
A new curfew banned anyone under 15 years of age from city streets at 10 p.m.
The North Dakota Reclamation convention was held in the city.
Mayor Fredrickson was toastmaster at a banquet in Rudolph Hotel.
A special winter STC term was set from November 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944.
The city took over garbage collection January 1, 1943. The service had been contracted.
A five inch snowfall blanketed northern North Dakota.
June 4, William T. Craswell resigned as fire chief. Oscar Rood was his successor. Craswell had been a department member 44 years.
J. C. Penney spoke at a Rotary Club program here.
Veterans of Foreign Wars had their state convention in the city.
The state speed limit was reduced to 35 miles per hour. Speeders were denied rationed gasoline.
STC’s Navy V-12 program enrolled 233.
Oliver Peterson purchased the Holberg-Peterson Funeral Home on 5th Avenue.
Thomas Hatch was named secretary of the Civic Club.
Price ceilings were set on beef, veal, and lamb.
A $298,000 War Bond Drive began. City stores closed two hours as the campaign started.
Additional sugar was made available for home canning.
Purchase of an $18.75 bond would be sufficient for a soldier’s summer outfit.
A.M. Paulson had resigned as Civic Club secretary to take an OPA job in Fargo.
A city panel was named to mediate consumer and store complaints on price ceilings.
Valley City remained on state mandated Mountain Time as rural residents indicated preference.
Guns taken from a dead Japanese soldier were on display at the city war museum.
A 50 voice Community Chorus made its debut at the Winter Show. Arthur Froemke was director and Arthur Lydell, accompanist. “Swede Hearts’ and other NBC stars were on the final program.
Bulls and gilts brought a$33,810 at Winter Show Sales.
Butter was rationed.
Two pounds of steak or three pounds hamburger were permitted each week.
Over a foot of snow fell March 15 and 16.
Durwood Otterson and Gudrun Mikkelson were king and queen of 4-H entries during the Corn and Lamb Show.
Jams and jellies were rationed, would cost four to six points.
Out of town postage was raised from three to four cents.
Seven planes came to the city to boost CAP enrollment.
Charles Hetland Produce was sold to Farms of the North Marketing System.
Si Severson announced eggs would be broken and frozen and that 20,000 dozen eggs, one carload, would be shipped daily. Fifty girls were to be employed.
Townsend Clubs had their first state convention in the city.
Senator Gerald P. Nye was speaker.
One Hundred city business people signed for harvest work at 60 cents per hour.
Alden Anderson left R & G Auto Supply Company to form Dakota Auto Supply, operating from the basement of his home.

1943
A new destroyer honored John Burke, Valley City, killed in the South Pacific.
Men 38 to 45 told to get war jobs or be drafted.
Jaycees named Carl Osen, Carpenter Lumber manager, outstanding young man.
Willard Carlson was elected Civic Club president.
Shoes were rationed beginning February 9. Rationing of canned fruits and vegetables were announced.
Record of the 164th at Guadalcanal was praised by Secretary of War Stimson.
WAAC’s were trained at state colleges.
Grocers protested the high point value on canned goods.
Price ceilings were set on eggs.
The city council urged approval of the proposed Baldhill Dam.
Harry Gilbertson sold Barnes county Implement to R. E. Blenn, Valley City and Fred Sahrowsky, Dickinson.
Influenza hit the community with 55 absent from high school.
A $250,000 grant to update the city airport was approved.
General Dwight Eisenhower was named invasion chief.
1943 grain production was highest in North Dakota history.
Esquire magazine was banned from mails.
Willard and Clarence Carlson sold their Main Street café after 25 years of operation to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Bulland. The Carlson brothers continued to operate a real estate office.
Dr. J. F. L. Bohnhoff, Trinity Church pastor for 48 years, died.
Six hundred soldiers from a tank detachment lead a military parade here. The event marked the close of harvest work done by troops. Detachments of troops had shocked 5, 910 acres of grain in on five day period.
A Japanese suicide submarine was display here when a $375,000 War Bond campaign got underway. Over 2, 500 persons viewed the sub.
Grocery “ceiling prices” were posted in stores.
A new curfew banned anyone under 15 years of age from city streets at 10 p.m.
The North Dakota Reclamation convention was held in the city.
Mayor Fredrickson was toastmaster at a banquet in Rudolph Hotel.
A special winter STC term was set from November 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944.
The city took over garbage collection January 1, 1943. The service had been contracted.
A five inch snowfall blanketed northern North Dakota.
June 4, William T. Craswell resigned as fire chief. Oscar Rood was his successor. Craswell had been a department member 44 years.
J. C. Penney spoke at a Rotary Club program here.
Veterans of Foreign Wars had their state convention in the city.
The state speed limit was reduced to 35 miles per hour. Speeders were denied rationed gasoline.
STC’s Navy V-12 program enrolled 233.
Oliver Peterson purchased the Holberg-Peterson Funeral Home on 5th Avenue.
Thomas Hatch was named secretary of the Civic Club.
Price ceilings were set on beef, veal, and lamb.
A $298,000 War Bond Drive began. City stores closed two hours as the campaign started.
Additional sugar was made available for home canning.
Purchase of an $18.75 bond would be sufficient for a soldier’s summer outfit.
A.M. Paulson had resigned as Civic Club secretary to take an OPA job in Fargo.
A city panel was named to mediate consumer and store complaints on price ceilings.
Valley City remained on state mandated Mountain Time as rural residents indicated preference.
Guns taken from a dead Japanese soldier were on display at the city war museum.
A 50 voice Community Chorus made its debut at the Winter Show. Arthur Froemke was director and Arthur Lydell, accompanist. “Swede Hearts’ and other NBC stars were on the final program.
Bulls and gilts brought a$33,810 at Winter Show Sales.
Butter was rationed.
Two pounds of steak or three pounds hamburger were permitted each week.
Over a foot of snow fell March 15 and 16.
Durwood Otterson and Gudrun Mikkelson were king and queen of 4-H entries during the Corn and Lamb Show.
Jams and jellies were rationed, would cost four to six points.
Out of town postage was raised from three to four cents.
Seven planes came to the city to boost CAP enrollment.
Charles Hetland Produce was sold to Farms of the North Marketing System.
Si Severson announced eggs would be broken and frozen and that 20,000 dozen eggs, one carload, would be shipped daily. Fifty girls were to be employed.
Townsend Clubs had their first state convention in the city.
Senator Gerald P. Nye was speaker.
One Hundred city business people signed for harvest work at 60 cents per hour.
Alden Anderson left R & G Auto Supply Company to form Dakota Auto Supply, operating from the basement of his home.