Posts from the ‘Valley City’ Category

1947 Valley City

1947

A second taxicab company opened in Valley City, with Charles Hill and Sam Thompson as owners.  Three cabs were on 24 hour call.

John Beck purchased the George Karshner Insurance Agency in the Middlewest building.

Thirty four new homes were built in the city as compared to only three such permits in 1945.

John Brandt, president of Land O’ Lakes, said the company was planning a $1,750,000 building program, included an all purpose plant in Valley City.

The city was allotted $40,000 in federal funds, to be match with $20,000 locally, to build an airport administration building.

Three hundred fifty new telephones have been installed in the city area, said I. H. Anderson, NW manager.

The Times Record did not publish January 4 because of the severe blizzard.

W. Atkinson, Devils Lake, representing Travelers’ insurance Company, moved to Valley City.

Carl Katz took over management of City Drug.

Pat Morgan sold his interests in Dakota Press to C. C. Morgan and F. R, Crowe.

The Kindred Hotel was being redecorated, with 48 rooms to be refinished.

C. V. Money resigned as STC athletic director.

Woodrow Gagnon, Fargo, purchased the Royal Café from J. O. Botten and Charlie Howard.

Lloyd Triebold took over management of the California Fruit Store, buying the business from Jake Chulse.

Clayton Thayer sold Spike’s Liquor Place to Wendlin Mattern and Joe Haman, Grand Forks, for a reported $26,000.

Rail and bus transportation came to a standstill in a blinding February 9 storm.

A vocational agriculture department was established at VCHS.

Charles Challey, LaMoure, was to head the department.

For the first time, the Arena and two other buildings were used for the Winter Show, although construction was not complete.

The Co-op Coffee Shop was opened by manager Harvey Aman at West Front.

Nearly 100 city businessmen were guests of GNDA when colored movies of the Garrison project were shown by bill Sebens.

Valley city purchased a new Seagraves fire engine for over $12,000.

Harlow Stillings was feted on the 25th anniversary of service as a rural mail carrier.

The Country Club received free trees from E. C. Hilborn’s nursery for planting along the fairways and tees.

NW Telephone company employees were on picket lines to show strike unity.

The AP called Valley City’s newspaper situation a journalistic crisis as friends of the editor-publisher called him liberal and enemies labeled him as radical.

Dr. Max Moore was nominated as governor of Rotary’s 117th district.

Appointment of Willis Osmon and C. H. Bliss to the STC athletic department was announced.

Andy Risem sold his photography studio to R. Kenneth McFarland.

Don Matchan turned down an offer to sell the Times Record to a group of businessmen.

Everything is “set to go” for baldhill Dam construction, said Mayor Curtis Olson.

The Red Owl Super Market was modernized.  Wayne Drugan was manager.

The Snow White laundry was opened by Monroe Pottorff.

O. S. (Hub) Peterson was elected N. D. funeral Directors’ president.

U. S. engineers called for bids on stage one construction of Baldhill Dam.

Walter A. Jensen was elected president of the N. D. Frozen Locker Association.

Ulman Equipment Company was sold to Farmotors, Inc.

The Times Record was sold by don Matchan to Jerome Bjerke, Milton and James Wick and Owen Scott.

Violet Lutz opened the Gift Shoppe.

The first Lutheran congregation voted to build a new church on the present site.

Halloween pranksters tipped over the eight foot high fountain in City Park.

Valley City’s American Legion post purchased a 42 passenger school bus for use by the public.

An eight foot granite monument was dedicated on Armistice Day observance on city auditorium grounds.  Inscribed were the name of the 80 Barnes County men who died in WW II.

Alden Anderson, owner of Dakota Auto Supply Company, purchased the Peterson Oil Company building on Second Street NW and Second Avenue. The company wholesaled to automotive dealers in the area.

John Halverson, oldest living former postmaster of Valley City, marked his 93rd birthday anniversary.

Dr. Lloyd C, Carlson opened practice of optometry in Middlewest Bank building.

A $250,000 bond issue to remodel the public school building was approved by voters by a 90 percent yes vote.

With installation of electric conveyors, the Bignall Lumber Company was ready to serve customers with a complete line of coal.

Spillway excavation and embankment work was near completion at Baldhill Dam.

Edward McGee, the city’s oldest resident, marked his 99th birthday anniversary.

The new library in the senior high school was dedicated as a memorial to Miss Thelma Torkelson.

At age 24, Walt Jensen was the youngest man to be elected president of the N. D. Frozen food Locker Association.

The council signed a contract with Olaf Wick to construct a 60 x 150 foot swimming pool for about $65,000.

Nearly 5,000 attended the Farmers Merchants Picnic sponsored here by city merchants.

Bernard C. Lyons opened a law office in the Middlewest Bank building.

C. L. Fennel, Minneapolis, purchased Frank’s Café from Frank Oulton.

Ground breaking ceremonies were held at the Baldhill Dam Site August 4.  Machines that would carry up to 20 tons of earth each trip were brought to Baldhill as the $1,600,000 construction project got underway.

Billy Krause won the city croquet championship by defeating Karen Lydell.  Krause also won the juvenile golf title.  Bob King was second.

Mrs. Ruth Hamilton, Fargo, was named manager of Miller’s Ready To Wear store.

Memorial half-dollars, honoring Booker T. Washington, were on sale at the Times Record.

Helen Lorns, Valley City, became director of state examinations in the N. D. Department of Public Instruction.

The State Air Fair and Circus was held in the city August 27 and 5,000 visitors attended.

The Sheyenne Hospital Association dedicated the ground secured from Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Maier.

Frank Oulton purchased Percy Polyhar’s Dry Cleaning establishment.

Mrs. Clara Bechtle was elected president of N. D. County Auditors.

World War II veterans began cashing terminal leave bonds.

Snow White Laundry was sold to Oliver Esby and Edwin Johnson by Monroe Portorffs.

The reconditioned Valley Hotel Bowling Alleys opened.

“We are working hard to translate an ideal into a reality,” said Dr. H. L. Lokken, STC president, in dedicating the site where the proposed $300,000 Sheyenne Hospital is to be constructed.

Oliver Peterson purchased full interest in the Holberg-Peterson Funeral Home, renaming it Oliver’s Chapel.

 

1924 in Valley City

1924

State basketball tournament was awarded to Valley City to be held in the new college gym.

H. C. Bjerke came here from Bismarck as manager of the Russell-Miller Milling Plant

Margaret Engemoen, Valley City. Won sixth prize in the state essay contest, “How to Keep Boys and Girls on the Farm.”

Clifford C. McDonald became the sole owner of the dry cleaning establishment of McDonald and Murdock.

The college basketball squad, coached by L. G. Hurst, won all but one of their contests and was named conference champions.

W. H. Pray was elected mayor of Valley City.

Plans for the new Piller theatre were in the hands of John Piller with construction expected during the summer.

Mrs. Marie Spiker was elected Most Excellent Chief of the Pythian sisters as that group held its first meeting.

Charley Hokanson was named chief of police replacing Mr. Swanson.

The Bank of valley city, following reorganization, opened for business with K. A Bonhus, president, and Frank Cook, vice-president.

A permanent organization for the Greater North Dakota Association was formed with Herman Stern, president, Dr. S. N. Thams, Fargo, had purchased the dental business of Dr. W. N. Palmer, who was leaving for California.

Father John Baker was elevated to Right Reverend Monsignor by Pope Pius XI.

Barnes County Courthouse was gutted by fire so officials would conduct business from City Hall.  The courthouse was built in 1882 and the fire came on the 5oth birthday of Barnes County.

Robertson’s Women’s Wear had leased space on top of the vault of the Bank of Valley City to be occupied by Molly Olson’s millinery shop.  Olson’s space was utilized for a beauty parlor.  John Gavin resigned as division engineer of the highway commission.

Two gas masks, two fire extinguishers and a life net were added to the fire department equipment.

The Northern Pacific announced it had completed automatic block systems on the railroad from St. Paul to the west coast.

Henry Kniprath and Victor Vaupel bought J. H. Sampson’s lunchroom.

Valley City Drum and Bugle Corps

Valley City Drum and Bugle Corps

The American Legion Post No. 60 Drum and Bugle corps was fist organized in 1927 with Glen Levitt in charge.  It was officially sponsored by the Valley city Voiture of 40 and 8.

The first official appearance was at the funeral of Alfred J. Henry, a Grand Army of the Republic member and father of Post commander T. S. Henry on September 3, 1927.

Deactivated with the advent of World War Two, it was reactivated in 1947 under the direction of Adrian H. Pfusch, the only World War member and the Drum Major of the original Corps.  Under his able direction the group improved in quality and style and was designated the official musical organization of the North Dakota 40 and 8, as well as the official musical organization of the City of Valley City, which entitled them to some financial support from the city.  This enabled the Corps to purchase new uniforms and instruments.  The Corps had been self-supporting up to this time.

The Corps attended four National American Legion Conventions; Minneapolis, Mn in 1959, Miami Beach, Florida in 1961; Dallas Texas in 1964 and Atlanta, Georgia in 1969 ably representing North Dakota and Barnes County in each case.

The Corps was deactivated in 1970.

• Russell-Miller Milling Company

Russell-Miller Milling Company Russell-Milling company, whose operations became part of the Peavey Company in 1953, began in Valley city, North Dakota. In 1879, a milling pioneer named Hiram Walker built a small water powered mill on the Sheyenne River at Valley City. Flour milRussell-Miller Milling Company Russell-Milling company, whose operations became part of the Peavey Company in 1953, began in Valley city, North Dakota. In 1879, a milling pioneer named Hiram Walker built a small water powered mill on the Sheyenne River at Valley City. Flour milling as an industry was beginning to establish it importance in this area, and with more extensive railroad lines in the north and west, the great spring wheat of the Red River Valley in North and South Dakota was gaining in importance. John Russell, a native of New York brought his family to Southern Minnesota in 1855, and after farming in Fillmore County for several years, engaged in grain business at Rushford in 1862. As an outgrowth of his interest in the grain business, the firm of Russell, Jones & Honstine was formed in the 1870’s for the purpose of milling wheat flour. Russell, known familiarly as “Uncle John”, set the highest possible standards in everything he did, and tried to exceed his mark. He did not readily accept the usual way of doing things, but was constantly on the alert for new and better methods. In 1879 the call of the West lured John Russell to Valley city, North Dakota, following the building of the Northern Pacific Railway west from Fargo. He invested in farm land, served the fast developing community by shipping many carloads of horses and mules, and with two or three others, helped to organized the first bank in the country _ later to become the First National Bank of Valley City. Mr. Russell as president of the bank until his death in 1907. “Uncle John’s “ arrival in Valley City found another pioneer, Hiram Walker, operating a little saw mill on the Sheyenne River, cutting timber that fringed its bank and hewing logs with which to build a flour mill. In 1882, Mr. Russell invited his son-in-law, Arthur Miller, to form a partnership in operating the mill acquired from Walker. Miller, who had gained his milling experience from England, accepted responsibility as superintendent of the mill’s operations. An interest in a quality product and utilizing the best milling processes lead Mr. Miller to promptly replace old stone burrs with roller in the first improvement to the water powered plant. Next, the old water wheel was replaced with a steam engine. These alterations enable the mill to produce 175 barrels of hard wheat flour per day. In 1886 Russell and Miller took the first step in a series of expansions which would eventually make the company the fourth largest milling firm in the nation. This was the purchase of a second mill at Jamestown, North Dakota. Subsequently, the partnership was incorporated as Russell & Miller Milling Company. The brand name “Occident”, meaning “out of the West” was selected because milling operations were situated in what was then the extreme western area of wheat production. As the company’s milling capacity grew, its allied interest progressed. Increased milling meant more need for grain and thus, proper storage facilities. The Russell & Miller Milling company built its first grain elevator in the years between 1882 and 1892. Mr. Miller studied varieties of wheat and experimented continuously with blends and processes for separation and purification. The company produced such a superior flour that it was sought throughout the North Dakota Region. The firm of Russell & Miller Milling Company was reorganized again in 1897 this time as Russell-Miller Milling Company and E. P. Wells joined the firm as president in rapid succession mills were acquired as Russell-Miller rose in prominence in the milling industry. During the period that Mr. Wells headed the firm, research increased with the start of an experimental bakery for quality control and the development of new methods of bakery production. A research kitchen for product development and test was also established to operate jointly with the bakery. By 1906 Russell-Miller’s capacity was 8,000 hundred weights (cwts). It had experienced fires both in Jamestown and Valley City, rebuilding these mills and constructing a new mill at Minot, North Dakota. In 1907 the company’s headquarters moved to Minneapolis where it built a major mill to take advantage of the tremendous stock of select wheat. This move further assured the high quality of “Occident” flour. The company continued to grow; 100 cwt mills were erected at Sidney and billing, Montana, and the Missouri Valley Milling Company was purchased with mills in Bismarck, Mandan and Dickinson, North Dakota. A second mille was built in Valley City and a production record for that era was established there when the two units produced 56,284 barrels of four in one month. The grain facilities were expanded by acquiring properties of the Lyon Elevator Company and Ireys Elevator Company. Harry S. Helm became the third president of Russell-Miller Milling Company in 1918. During this time the Valley City “Occident” mills ran for 61 consecutive days – full 24 hours _ without a minute’s shutdown; and 116 consecutive days with a total shutdown of only 17 hours and 30 minutes. Another company record was established when the Minot, North Dakota mill operated 318 consecutive 24 hour days in one calendar year. A line of country elevators was built in the billings areas during this time, while at Grand Forks, North Dakota, a frame mill was torn down and replaced with a new brick mill in 29 days. This was also the era when trucks replaced horse drawn wagons for flour delivery. In 1919 the Minneapolis milling operation were increased to a capacity of 11,000cwts. The firm moved eastward out of its traditional territory in 1924, building a 3,600 cwt mill in Buffalo, New York. The older half of the Minneapolis mill was then closed as were the mils in Jamestown, Bismarck and Dickinson, as the remaining mills were enlarged. Russell-Miller acquired Everett, Aughenbugh & Company in 1925 and while the mills of this old western Minnesota business were never operated, the E-A company brands were retained. In 1932 a feed plant was opened to manufacture some 40 types of commercial feed for livestock and poultry. These feeds – made from Montana grains and some 30 other materials from other sections of the United States – were distributed throughout Central Montana and northern Wyoming. C. G. Ireys became the company’s fourth president in 1939. Until 1941 Russell-Miller had concentrated its operation in the spring wheat area; with the acquisition of Stanard-Tilton Milling Company of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1942 Leslie F. Miller (son of Arthur Miller) became the fifth president of Russell-Miller. Fire destroyed the mill at Alton, Illinois, which was later rebuilt to be the largest of the Russell-Miller mills. The company’s services were further expanded when an insecticide plant was built in 1948 to produce dusts for spraying. When liquid chemicals began replacing the dust, the plant was rebuilt and in 1951 was ready to handle the processing of seeds. While the four side of Russell-Miller’s business was growing, the company was also developing its country and terminal elevator division which purchased millions of bushels of wheat from North Dakota farmers, primarily as a source of supply to the mills. By 1953 Russell-Miller had 143 country elevators, some of which had expanded to include coal, lumber, and gasoline supplies for the farmers whose grain they took in Montana and North Dakota. The division had also begun operation of a seed house in North Dakota and two feed merchandising plants in North Dakota and Montana. The elevator divisions were operating large terminals to facilitate the movement of grain in Minneapolis and Buffalo, New York. In 1954, control of Russell-Miller Company was acquired by Peavey Company, and George W. P. Heffelfinger became Russell-Miller’s sixth president. Russell-Miller was the first milling company in the country to depart from the norm of packaging flour in white bags. In 1955, the company began packing their four in a newly designed orange bag. In 1960, Russell-Miller became a Peavey division under the name of Russell-Miller-King Midas Mills, and in 1963 the division name was again changed to Peavey Company Flour Mills. These milling operation were all a part of Peavey’s Industrial Food Group. Peavey was one of the country’s largest flour millers and a leading producer of durum products for the pasta industry. In addition to bakery flour, the company had Occident, King Midas and Hungarian brands available for the consumer. To read me, take time to read these links. http://www.flickr.com/photos/23711298@N07/sets/72157625363229411/ http://foodcompanycookbooks.blogspot.com/2006/12/occident-flour-milling.html http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/ConAgra-Inc-Company-History.html ling as an industry was beginning to establish it importance in this area, and with more extensive railroad lines in the north and west, the great spring wheat of the Red River Valley in North and South Dakota was gaining in importance. John Russell, a native of New York brought his family to Southern Minnesota in 1855, and after farming in Fillmore County for several years, engaged in grain business at Rushford in 1862. As an outgrowth of his interest in the grain business, the firm of Russell, Jones & Honstine was formed in the 1870’s for the purpose of milling wheat flour. Russell, known familiarly as “Uncle John”, set the highest possible standards in everything he did, and tried to exceed his mark. He did not readily accept the usual way of doing things, but was constantly on the alert for new and better methods. In 1879 the call of the West lured John Russell to Valley city, North Dakota, following the building of the Northern Pacific Railway west from Fargo. He invested in farm land, served the fast developing community by shipping many carloads of horses and mules, and with two or three others, helped to organized the first bank in the country _ later to become the First National Bank of Valley City. Mr. Russell as president of the bank until his death in 1907. “Uncle John’s “ arrival in Valley City found another pioneer, Hiram Walker, operating a little saw mill on the Sheyenne River, cutting timber that fringed its bank and hewing logs with which to build a flour mill. In 1882, Mr. Russell invited his son-in-law, Arthur Miller, to form a partnership in operating the mill acquired from Walker. Miller, who had gained his milling experience from England, accepted responsibility as superintendent of the mill’s operations. An interest in a quality product and utilizing the best milling processes lead Mr. Miller to promptly replace old stone burrs with roller in the first improvement to the water powered plant. Next, the old water wheel was replaced with a steam engine. These alterations enable the mill to produce 175 barrels of hard wheat flour per day. In 1886 Russell and Miller took the first step in a series of expansions which would eventually make the company the fourth largest milling firm in the nation. This was the purchase of a second mill at Jamestown, North Dakota. Subsequently, the partnership was incorporated as Russell & Miller Milling Company. The brand name “Occident”, meaning “out of the West” was selected because milling operations were situated in what was then the extreme western area of wheat production. As the company’s milling capacity grew, its allied interest progressed. Increased milling meant more need for grain and thus, proper storage facilities. The Russell & Miller Milling company built its first grain elevator in the years between 1882 and 1892. Mr. Miller studied varieties of wheat and experimented continuously with blends and processes for separation and purification. The company produced such a superior flour that it was sought throughout the North Dakota Region. The firm of Russell & Miller Milling Company was reorganized again in 1897 this time as Russell-Miller Milling Company and E. P. Wells joined the firm as president in rapid succession mills were acquired as Russell-Miller rose in prominence in the milling industry. During the period that Mr. Wells headed the firm, research increased with the start of an experimental bakery for quality control and the development of new methods of bakery production. A research kitchen for product development and test was also established to operate jointly with the bakery. By 1906 Russell-Miller’s capacity was 8,000 hundred weights (cwts). It had experienced fires both in Jamestown and Valley City, rebuilding these mills and constructing a new mill at Minot, North Dakota. In 1907 the company’s headquarters moved to Minneapolis where it built a major mill to take advantage of the tremendous stock of select wheat. This move further assured the high quality of “Occident” flour. The company continued to grow; 100 cwt mills were erected at Sidney and billing, Montana, and the Missouri Valley Milling Company was purchased with mills in Bismarck, Mandan and Dickinson, North Dakota. A second mille was built in Valley City and a production record for that era was established there when the two units produced 56,284 barrels of four in one month. The grain facilities were expanded by acquiring properties of the Lyon Elevator Company and Ireys Elevator Company. Harry S. Helm became the third president of Russell-Miller Milling Company in 1918. During this time the Valley City “Occident” mills ran for 61 consecutive days – full 24 hours _ without a minute’s shutdown; and 116 consecutive days with a total shutdown of only 17 hours and 30 minutes. Another company record was established when the Minot, North Dakota mill operated 318 consecutive 24 hour days in one calendar year. A line of country elevators was built in the billings areas during this time, while at Grand Forks, North Dakota, a frame mill was torn down and replaced with a new brick mill in 29 days. This was also the era when trucks replaced horse drawn wagons for flour delivery. In 1919 the Minneapolis milling operation were increased to a capacity of 11,000cwts. The firm moved eastward out of its traditional territory in 1924, building a 3,600 cwt mill in Buffalo, New York. The older half of the Minneapolis mill was then closed as were the mils in Jamestown, Bismarck and Dickinson, as the remaining mills were enlarged. Russell-Miller acquired Everett, Aughenbugh & Company in 1925 and while the mills of this old western Minnesota business were never operated, the E-A company brands were retained. In 1932 a feed plant was opened to manufacture some 40 types of commercial feed for livestock and poultry. These feeds – made from Montana grains and some 30 other materials from other sections of the United States – were distributed throughout Central Montana and northern Wyoming. C. G. Ireys became the company’s fourth president in 1939. Until 1941 Russell-Miller had concentrated its operation in the spring wheat area; with the acquisition of Stanard-Tilton Milling Company of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1942 Leslie F. Miller (son of Arthur Miller) became the fifth president of Russell-Miller. Fire destroyed the mill at Alton, Illinois, which was later rebuilt to be the largest of the Russell-Miller mills. The company’s services were further expanded when an insecticide plant was built in 1948 to produce dusts for spraying. When liquid chemicals began replacing the dust, the plant was rebuilt and in 1951 was ready to handle the processing of seeds. While the four side of Russell-Miller’s business was growing, the company was also developing its country and terminal elevator division which purchased millions of bushels of wheat from North Dakota farmers, primarily as a source of supply to the mills. By 1953 Russell-Miller had 143 country elevators, some of which had expanded to include coal, lumber, and gasoline supplies for the farmers whose grain they took in Montana and North Dakota. The division had also begun operation of a seed house in North Dakota and two feed merchandising plants in North Dakota and Montana. The elevator divisions were operating large terminals to facilitate the movement of grain in Minneapolis and Buffalo, New York. In 1954, control of Russell-Miller Company was acquired by Peavey Company, and George W. P. Heffelfinger became Russell-Miller’s sixth president. Russell-Miller was the first milling company in the country to depart from the norm of packaging flour in white bags. In 1955, the company began packing their four in a newly designed orange bag. In 1960, Russell-Miller became a Peavey division under the name of Russell-Miller-King Midas Mills, and in 1963 the division name was again changed to Peavey Company Flour Mills. These milling operation were all a part of Peavey’s Industrial Food Group. Peavey was one of the country’s largest flour millers and a leading producer of durum products for the pasta industry. In addition to bakery flour, the company had Occident, King Midas and Hungarian brands available for the consumer. To read me, take time to read these links. http://www.flickr.com/photos/23711298@N07/sets/72157625363229411/ http://foodcompanycookbooks.blogspot.com/2006/12/occident-flour-milling.html http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/ConAgra-Inc-Company-History.html

Western Hotel

Western Hotel

According to Con Schweinler, an early settler who came to
the valley in 1874 and settled south of Valley City (then known as “Second
Crossing”) he found a hotel being conducted in a tent, there being no building
other than the section house.  In the
front end of this hotel, James Morrison sold calico and sugar as well as the
meals which Donald D. McFadgen cooked in the back end of the tent.  There were sleeping bunks along the
sidewalls.  The establishment was known
as “The Western Hotel”.  Others have
indicated that Donald D. McFadgen did not do the cooking but that a man by the
name of Richard McKinnon was in partnership with James Morrison.  The Andreas Atlas, the first atlas of the
Dakotas, notes that it was Donald D. McFadgen and McKinnon who had the hotel.

Where can one get a new court house for the sum of $529.89?

Where can one get a new court house for the sum of $529.89?

That was the total cost of the first Barnes County Court House.  Situated about where the county jail now stands, the building was authorized on July 29, 1879 by the First Board of county Commissioners.

The contract for the construction of the new building was let to D. D. McFadgen, then the first sheriff.  Perhaps there was a conflict of interest here, but it was more probable that carpenters were hard to come by and the sheriff had little to do since the total population of the county did not exceed 1500.

The following October 6th the commissioners allowed the payment for the following bills for the erection of the building:  D. D. McFadgen, Labor $139.45, Walter F. Jones, lumber $284.48; L. L. Humble, painting $6.40 and H. G. Hourne, paints and oils, $12. 42.

The Clerk of Court occupied the upper story, reached by an outside stairway.  The remainder of the County Officials shared the one big room on the first floor.  Most of their business, however, was conducted from their business or shops or farms, or from their vest pockets, as the case might be.

With the rapid growth of the county and the many land transactions, more space was needed and in 1883 a new court house was authorized by a vote of the people and bonds were to b e issued in the amount of $35,000.This amount was to be used to build the new court house and to refund the county indebtedness.

The bonds were duly sold and when the money was received, the County Treasurer, A. M. Pease, absconded with the bond money and all the taxes that had been collected.  He was never apprehended and the money was never recovered.  However, the Treasurer was bonded and the money recovered from the bonding agents, and the building of the court house went forward.

With the completion of the new court house, the old structure was used as a storehouse for a time but then finally sold and moved onto the block north of the court house block, where it was used as a bar first and then as a garage.

Upon the death of Mrs. Musselman, who owned the property, the building was sold to a Mr. Bjornson, who moved it to his far.  Mr. Paul Bjornson then used it as a horse stable until in the 1950’s when it was again sold to Mr. Walter Vanurden, who moved it to his farm west of the city on old highway 10.  There some eighty years after it glorious beginning, it was torn down to make room for a modern steel building.

Where can one get a new court house for the sum of $529.89?

That was the total cost of the first Barnes County Court House.  Situated about where the county jail now stands, the building was authorized on July 29, 1879 by the First Board of county Commissioners.

The contract for the construction of the new building was let to D. D. McFadgen, then the first sheriff.  Perhaps there was a conflict of interest here, but it was more probable that carpenters were hard to come by and the sheriff had little to do since the total population of the county did not exceed 1500.

The following October 6th the commissioners allowed the payment for the following bills for the erection of the building:  D. D. McFadgen, Labor $139.45, Walter F. Jones, lumber $284.48; L. L. Humble, painting $6.40 and H. G. Hourne, paints and oils, $12. 42.

The Clerk of Court occupied the upper story, reached by an outside stairway.  The remainder of the County Officials shared the one big room on the first floor.  Most of their business, however, was conducted from their business or shops or farms, or from their vest pockets, as the case might be.

With the rapid growth of the county and the many land transactions, more space was needed and in 1883 a new court house was authorized by a vote of the people and bonds were to b e issued in the amount of $35,000.This amount was to be used to build the new court house and to refund the county indebtedness.

The bonds were duly sold and when the money was received, the County Treasurer, A. M. Pease, absconded with the bond money and all the taxes that had been collected.  He was never apprehended and the money was never recovered.  However, the Treasurer was bonded and the money recovered from the bonding agents, and the building of the court house went forward.

With the completion of the new court house, the old structure was used as a storehouse for a time but then finally sold and moved onto the block north of the court house block, where it was used as a bar first and then as a garage.

Upon the death of Mrs. Musselman, who owned the property, the building was sold to a Mr. Bjornson, who moved it to his far.  Mr. Paul Bjornson then used it as a horse stable until in the 1950’s when it was again sold to Mr. Walter Vanurden, who moved it to his farm west of the city on old highway 10.  There some eighty years after it glorious beginning, it was torn down to make room for a modern steel building.

Where can one get a new court house for the sum of $529.89?

That was the total cost of the first Barnes County Court House.  Situated about where the county jail now stands, the building was authorized on July 29, 1879 by the First Board of county Commissioners.

The contract for the construction of the new building was let to D. D. McFadgen, then the first sheriff.  Perhaps there was a conflict of interest here, but it was more probable that carpenters were hard to come by and the sheriff had little to do since the total population of the county did not exceed 1500.

The following October 6th the commissioners allowed the payment for the following bills for the erection of the building:  D. D. McFadgen, Labor $139.45, Walter F. Jones, lumber $284.48; L. L. Humble, painting $6.40 and H. G. Hourne, paints and oils, $12. 42.

The Clerk of Court occupied the upper story, reached by an outside stairway.  The remainder of the County Officials shared the one big room on the first floor.  Most of their business, however, was conducted from their business or shops or farms, or from their vest pockets, as the case might be.

With the rapid growth of the county and the many land transactions, more space was needed and in 1883 a new court house was authorized by a vote of the people and bonds were to b e issued in the amount of $35,000.This amount was to be used to build the new court house and to refund the county indebtedness.

The bonds were duly sold and when the money was received, the County Treasurer, A. M. Pease, absconded with the bond money and all the taxes that had been collected.  He was never apprehended and the money was never recovered.  However, the Treasurer was bonded and the money recovered from the bonding agents, and the building of the court house went forward.

With the completion of the new court house, the old structure was used as a storehouse for a time but then finally sold and moved onto the block north of the court house block, where it was used as a bar first and then as a garage.

Upon the death of Mrs. Musselman, who owned the property, the building was sold to a Mr. Bjornson, who moved it to his far.  Mr. Paul Bjornson then used it as a horse stable until in the 1950’s when it was again sold to Mr. Walter Vanurden, who moved it to his farm west of the city on old highway 10.  There some eighty years after it glorious beginning, it was torn down to make room for a modern steel building.

Barnes County’s First Hotel

Barnes County’s First Hotel

Perhaps the most popular place in the early village of Valley City was its one and only hotel, The Valley City Hotel.

Located on Third Avenue southeast just north of what was Green Valley Laundry, the hotel was for a time the center of all activity in the village.  Both the famous and the unknown stopped here and many an early settler spent his or her first night in Barnes County in this hotel.

The proprietors were Mr. and Mrs. Hanson and their two daughters, Fannie and Hulda.  Here one could get a full meal for twenty five cents and all the coffee one could drink.  While the rooms were small by today’s standards, they were as comfortable as the times allowed.

It was the noon dinner stops over for passengers on the Northern pacific before the dining car appeared on the railroad scene.  The depot at the time was located at the upper end of the street and the hotel was only a short walk away from the train as it stopped.

Somewhat later another hotel, the Sherman House, was built but its clients were mainly the commercial travelers and the Valley City Hotel remained the social center of the village.  Dances were held here as well as amateur play practices.

In April of 1880 the Sherman House which had been owned by Charley Hokanson, changed hands and in the same month the Valley city Hotel closed its doors due to the owners having decided to go farming.  The hotel did reopen but under other management in the fall and later the Hansons resumed the management.  However, with the building of several other small hotels and the famed Kindred Hotel in 1884 the Valley City Hotel passed out of existence.

As is usually the case, the building became a rooming house and was such for many years until it was torn down sometime in the 1950’sl  If its walls could have talked , the stories would have made good listening!

The First Letter

The First Letter

In 1873, the first letter received via Northern Pacific mail car in what is now Valley City was addressed thus: padi dolein, 2x, Shi, which deciphers to paddy Dolein, Second Crossing of the Sheyenne, which was at one time given to the Valley City area. Only summer service was maintained; winter months the mail was carried by soldiers with dog teams. These soldiers received one dollar a piece for letters and 50 cents apiece for newspaper delivery from early settlers. This service was the only news communication with the outside world.
The first person to handle mail in this area, when no towns existed west of Fargo to Bismarck with small settlements exceptions, was one of the Worthington brothers, followed by Mr. Bates and Peter Seeman who distributed mail from their lumberyard and blacksmith shops. None of the three were ever officially appointed postmaster.
Peter Connors was the first officially appointed postmaster. He was appointed in 1876 when the first official post office was established here. This first post office was located south of the Northern Pacific track about 600 feet west of the railroad bridge in a building later occupied by a Chinese laundry. The second location was on the site of the American National Bank. From there it was moved in the night to the present Bong’s Bootery lot, then to the rear of the First National Bank and finally in 1917 to its present location.

Pioneer Business Firms Flourished 100 Years Ago

Pioneer Business Firms Flourished 100 Years Ago
Written in 1983

In 1879 when Barnes was organized, there were but five houses on the site of Valley City. Settlers commenced arriving slowly, but they were generally a solid and substantial band and they laid the foundation of the community intelligently and well.
In 1879, a sprightly little journal, called the Northern Pacific Times, which is now know as the Valley City Time Record, made its appearance and the following year witnessed the organization of numerous business houses, and the Valley City Bank. The population of the village in 1880 was upwards of 1,000, but 1881 was the red letter year in its settlement, for then the tide of immigration began flowing. Churches, hotels, public buildings, stores and residences were raised and by 1883, when the city was incorporated there were nearly 2, 000 residences.
This December, 1883 issue of “Leading Industries of the West” lists these pioneer business establishments.
The Kindred Hotel
This exceptionally elegant hotel was erected in 1882-83 and opened to public patronage July 2, 1883, under the management of Meir and Stanton and very soon thereafter came under the sole control of G. W. Stanton, Jr. The Kindred was an attractive brick structure, 100x 100 feet in area and having three stories. Sixty comfortable, well appointed and neatly furnished chambers were in use for accommodation of traveling public. Construction cost was $45,000 and an additional $15,000 was spent by the owner, Thos. Adams, to furnish it. The halls and corridors, parlor and reception rooms were elegantly furnished and carpeted; ceilings were lofty, and stairways wide.

Edward & Blackwell Lumber Company
In January 1883, this corporation bought the business and stock of W. F. Jones and succeeded him in the lumber business. Mr. Edwards was president and general manager of the Kansas Lumber Company, with headquarter in Topeka.
The Valley City yard was located on the N. P, track, was several hundred feet in area, carried an average stock of 5oo,ooo feet and annual sale was about 2,000,000.
C. A. Benson
Mr. Benson established his hardware house in 1879. The building was adjoin the Kindred Hotel and consisted of a salesroom 25 x 90 in size plus a warehouse 10 x 24 adjoining. There was also a tin shop in connection and general manufacturing and repair was carried on here. The hardware was well stocked with all kinds of heavy hardware and shelf goods, pocket and table cutlery, cooking and heating stoves, tin, sheet iron, and copper ware and wire.
Mr. Benson also operated a large depot for sale of agriculture implements and transaction in the department brought the total sales in 1883 to nearly $100,000.
Dickey & Fish
Among the leading law, land and loan representatives in the pioneer community were G. H. Dickey and F. M. Fish. The partnership was formed in 1882, with the men practicing in all territorial and federal courts before the local land office and the general department in Washington. Mr. Dickey was the first member of the Legislature elected from this district.
B. W. Benson
Established in 1879, Mr. Benson’s realty business by 1883 was the most extensive I the Northwest. He had vast acreage of wild and cultivated, town and rural property upwards of 100,000 acres for disposal to new settlers, and his holdings included land in Barnes, Lamoure, Stutsman, Griggs and Trail counties. He was a vice president of the First National Bank, a member of the Territorial House of Representatives and a member of the school board.
M. Carlson

Mr. Carlson owned several businesses and residential lots in Valley City, and in addition, was a wholesale and retail dealer in wines, liquors, tobacco and cigars. He also operated a billiard hall.

Dr. C. Corey
Dr. Corey was a veterinary surgeon who in 1882 established a livery stable in the booming community of Valley City. The livery stable had room for 100 horses, although stalls for only 22. He kept 12 horses for livery trade.
F. H. Adams
Mr. Adams, who served as Barnes County attorney from 1878 until 1881, was a dealer in wheat lands and city property. His rates were quoted as $4 to 10 per acre for wild land, $10 to 20 per acre for improved land and $75 to 500 each for city lots.
Charles Hollinshead
The honor of establishing the first livery stable in Valley City goes to Hollinshead. A resident of Pawnee City Nebraska, he came to North Dakota in the first tide of immigration in 1880 and that same year set up his business. His first stable was too small and by 1883 he had a fine two story building on the corner of Second Street and Fourth Avenue. There were accommodations for 60 head of horses.
O. P. Enerson
The general merchandise store operated by O. P. Enerson in 1883 had been established in Valley City by J. Hauser.
The sales room was 25×80 in size and the store carried practically every type of general merchandise. Mr. Enerson was elected alderman from the Second Ward in 1883, the first to serve in this capacity.
Paul Parrodeau
This gentleman was the only exclusive dealer in coal and wood in pioneer Valley City. His business was established in August, 1883. All kinds of wood were furnished, either in cordwood shape, cut to desired length or split, and coal was brought from Ohio and Pennsylvania mines as well as from the lignite fields of North Dakota. Mr. Parrodeau came to Valley City in 1880.
Cummings Brothers
The Cummings Brothers, native of Toronto, Canada, established a feel and sale stable in 1883 and sold mules, horses, and stock of any kind on commission. They also owned a livery service.
J. W. Scott
Mr. Scott, one of the leading attorneys, notaries, and real estate brokers in Dakota, established his business here in 1181. In addition to his law practice, he had acquired 60,000 acres of land for sale in Griggs and Barnes Counties. Price ranged from $6 to $25 per acre.
Mrs. F. A. Blodgett
Mrs. Blodgett was an artistic and experienced milliner and dress maker. She also handled ladies’ finishing goods, hosiery, hair goods and her trade embraced the most fashionable ladies of Valley City, Sanborn, Tower City, and Oriska. She also taught stamping, Kensington embroidery and painting.
Fifth Avenue Meat Market
This market was conducted by James Smith, who came directly from Scotland to Valley City to establish the business in 1882. He was the first merchant to offer free delivery to any part of the city.
O. N. Rushfelt
On July 4, 1881, O. N. Rushfelt established a general harness-making business here. He carried a well assorted stock of harness, saddles, collars, bridles, whip, combs, etc., and employed several expert harness makers.
Lund and Pederson
This firm of merchant tailors and importers of fine cloths and trimmings was established in 1883 and conducted the only establishment of its kind in Valley City. Both were practical and skilled in tailoring and employed several expert cutters.

C. S. Deshon
C. S. Deshon carried a complete stock of fancy groceries, books, stationery, tobacco, cigars, and smokers’ sundries and also a varied assortment of choice confections. He was the only dealer in books and stationery in Valley City. Mr. Deshon, a native of Kentucky, came here in 1882.
He operated the Northern Pacific Hotel during 1883. This hotel, one of the pioneer establishments of its kind in the city, was established in 1879. Located near the railroad depot, it had a frontage 75 feet and contained 40 sleeping rooms, all large, airy, and comfortably furnished.
Thomas & Endress
The pharmaceutical business, represented in Valley City in 1883 by Thomas and Endress, was established by Dr. Harvey in 1881. All kinds of drugs, chemicals, medicines, paints, oils, sundries, toilet wares, perfumery and kindred articles were carried in addition to a full line of fancy articles, stationery, wall paper, confectionery, tobacco, cigars and smokers ‘sundries.
Mason & Barton
Without a skillful blacksmith at hand, the farmers of North Dakota with numerous labor-saving machines would be continually in “hot water, “, since there is no telling when something is going to break. Valley City had a good pioneer day establishment, operated by Mason and Barton.
The business was established by Mr. Mason in 1880 and Mr. Barton became associated with him in 1882. The two forges in the smithy were always burning.

O. Lund
Mr. Lund was one of the first men to take up residence in Valley City and in 1881 he established the first meat market here. He came here from Fargo where he had settled in 1869 and erected the second building in that city. His butcher business kept up with the increasing growth of Valley City and his stock in the early days included both fresh and cured meats and game and fish in season.
Haberstich & Stair
These men operated the “O. K. Restaurant” under the First National Bank and furnished meats to transients and regular patrons at all hours. Both came from Indiana where they had long experience in the catering business.
Pacific House
This was one of the pioneer business establishments in Valley City, the building having been erected and a hotel started in 1879. There were eight rooms for the accommodations of guest and meals were served to lodgers.
It was operated by Jerome Kintner.
W. R. Williams
In March of 1983, Mr. Williams took over the livery and feed stable on Third Avenue which had been established in 1879 by Charles Hollinshead. The demand for teams and vehicles in 1883 was tremendous as new settler’s desired transportation to look over their land.
Mr. Williams had accommodations for thirty head of horses and had 15 head of fine horses kept for livery purposes.
Thomas Thompson
Dr. Thompson was a graduate of Edinburgh Veterinary College of Scotland and prior to establishing himself in Valley City in August, 1882, had 30 years of practice in both civil and military life in Great Britain and the United States. He was a veterinary surgeon for the famous 7th United States Cavalry.
F. H. Remington
In 1881 Mr. Remington established a law office in Valley City and also negotiated loans on first mortgage security and made a specialty of loans and chattels. His holding included a farm of 1,800 acres here, 725 of which were sown to wheat in 1883 and averaged twenty bushels to the acre.

J. S. Weiser
Mr. Weiser came to Valley City in 1877 and established a small general merchandise store, which by 1883 had grown to a very large store. He added a lumberyard, an agricultural implement department and farmed 320 acres, 258 of which were in cultivation in that year. The general store was 30x 100, two stories high and carried the largest and most complete stock to be found in the Territory at that time. With four warehouse, his lumberyard, and the store, the total number of square feet under roof exceeded 10,000. He was county treasurer for three terms, a director of the First National Bank, and owner of many fine residence and business lot in Valley City.
P. O. King
Mr. King, in 1883, was the proprietor of the only house furnishing goods in Valley City. The store was established in 1879 and carried a full line of carpeting, picture frames, wall paper, moldings, brackets, coffins, caskets, mortuary goods and household sundries in addition to furniture. He manufactured to order in his shop and warehouse on Main Street.
The People’s Loan and Trust
The People’s Loan and Trusts Company, Meril D. Hill, manager, bought and sold land, examined titles, made abstracts, paid taxes for non-residents and conducted a general loan and land business. It was organized in 1882; Mr. Hill was an attorney at FondDuLac, prior to coming to Valley City.
Parkhouse and Sayles
Parkhouse and Sayles were in 1883, the largest mercantile establishment in the community, with a full and complete line of goods, except drugs and hardware supplies. The firm occupied a three-story brick building, every story of which was crowded with goods.
The firm bought stock in Boston, New York and Chicago as well as from St. Paul and Minneapolis.
D. W. & F. C. Clark
This pioneer insurance agency was established in 1881 by D. W. Clark and the partnership form in August 1881. They issued policies against losses by fire, tornado and lightning as well as being agents for some of the most prominent life and accident companies.
Dakota House
This hostelry was located on Main Street opposite the N. P. depot and had twenty-five rooms, sample rooms for commercial travelers; a dining room, bar, and billiard parlor. In 1883 it was under the management of Mr. O’Malley who had resided here three years.
John Simons
Mr. Simons’ farm machinery business was located on Third Avenue and the premises had ample storage capacity and a complete stock of harvesting machinery, reapers, and mowers, buggies, spring wagons, windmills, pumps, sewing machines, etc. He established the business in 1879. Mr. Simon was elected sheriff and served six years in that capacity.

Henry Wold
A dealer in saddler, harness, boots, and shoes. Mr. Wold established is business in Valley City in 1879. He was a manufacturer as well as a dealer. He purchased the greater part of his stock I Chicago and St. Paul but bought whips in Staunton, Mass.
James Allen
The jewelry and watch making industry was represented in early Valley City by only one establishment, that of James Allen. He carried a full stock of all goods from five cent collar button to a $20 gold watch. He also carried optical goods and was an artistic engraver. Mr. Allen established his business here in 1882.
Northern Pacific Elevator
This company transacted a vast amount of business and handled upwards of 400,000 bushels of grain yearly. The elevator at Valley City was managed by A. W. Wenk. It had a capacity of 60,000 bushels, was 30 x 150 in size, with 60 feet elevation: was operated by steam power furnished by a fifteen horsepower engine and twenty horsepower boiler; had facilities for cleaning and forwarding of 8,000 bushels of grain daily. During 882, 200,000 bushels were received and shipped with exports made principally to Duluth and Minneapolis.
G. K. Andrus
G. K. Andrus was an attorney who conducted a real estate, collection and insurance business. He possessed a large amount of cultivated land himself and had land for sale throughout the wheat belt.
In 1883 he was city attorney, Mr. Andrus had an interest in the Valley City Opera House and was manager of this institution.

Tuesday Club Credited for Start of Library in Valley City

Tuesday Club Credited for Start of Library in Valley City
The history of the Valley City Public Library is unique. At the turn of the century, Valley was a little town of 4, 000 population on the high plains and prairies of North Dakota. Cultural advantages were few. One of them was the Reading Circle movement. From this movement developed the Tuesday Club of Valley City, the oldest women’s club in Valley City and the second oldest in the state.
I It was on January 8, 1895, that 20 women became charter members of the Tuesday Club. They expressed their purpose in the constitution, which stated they organized “for mutual development of the members in literature, art, history, science and the vital issues of the day.”
The first president of the Tuesday Club, in 1895, was Mrs. Adolph Sternberg. Her husband was the owner of the Sternberg Store, which was purchased in 1910 by the Straus Clothing Company.
Mrs. Sternberg was a woman of brilliant mentality and artist in her own right. Her driving force got the Tuesday Club off to an excellent start. The 20 ladies met fortnightly on Tuesdays at each other’s homes. The programs were literary in style, centered in the fields of literature, art, science, history and the vital issues of the day. They had difficulty finding materials for their programs. No libraries were available. Few books and magazines could be found. Out of that need came to these good women the idea of getting a public library for Valley City.
The Tuesday Club set to work determinedly on that project. When their delegates to the state convention returned with $.10 remaining from their expense account, the Tuesday Club voted that this amount be used to start a “public library fund”.
When they went to work to increase that fund, staging bazaars, exhibits, lectures, concerts and publishing of a cook book. The fun soon reached $700. George Young, whose brilliant wife was a member of the club, gave them an old house which they sold for $300.
They began to write letters, to the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation, and others. All replies were noncommittal. But the Carnegie reply contained only one ray of hope. It stated that the population of Valley City (4,000) did not seem to justify a public library at that time. The women of the Tuesday Club renewed their efforts. They drew some men into their plans—Frank White, soon governor of the state; George M. Young, state senator, and Herman Winterer, whose wife conducted much of this correspondence.
Correspondence continued. There was much of it. In the office of Herman Winterer was a young lawyer just fresh out of law school at Ann Arbor, Michigan. He became interested in the project and prepared most of the correspondence. This young lawyer was D. S. Ritchie.
At length, a letter came from the Carnegie Corporation stating it would grant $15,000 for construction of a public library at Valley City provided the site was furnished debt free, and providing that city council would guarantee to maintain and operate the library in perpetuity.
The Tuesday Club purchased the site. They approached the city council. The council favored the 1 mill tax levy, but wanted public reaction. The public voted for the tax levy.
Then it became apparent that the income from the 1 percent mill levy permitted by state law would not sufficient to maintain and operate the public library. These indomitable women then persuaded State Senator George M. White to introduce in the Legislature a new bill permitted a 4 mill tax levy for the public. The bill passed in the House and Senate, and was signed by Governor Frank White, and became a law. Now they were ready for the Carnegie grant which came at once and the library was constructed in 1902-03.
The building was soundly constructed in the beginning and has been taken care of in excellent fashion these past years. At first it had its own heating plant from which a small fire started on one occasion. Smoke from the fire darkened the furniture and the interior of the building. The furniture was first painted green and then dark mission. During WPA days labor and material were made available for renovation of the library. Mr. Karl J Olsen, then a member of both the Board of Education and the Library Board, assumed supervision of the project. All the mission paint and veneer were removed and the beautiful original quartered oak finish restored.