Posts from the ‘Valley City’ Category

1947 Valley City

1947

A second taxicab company opened in Valley City, with Charles Hill and Sam Thompson as owners.  Three cabs were on 24 hour call.

John Beck purchased the George Karshner Insurance Agency in the Middlewest building.

Thirty four new homes were built in the city as compared to only three such permits in 1945.

John Brandt, president of Land O’ Lakes, said the company was planning a $1,750,000 building program, included an all purpose plant in Valley City.

The city was allotted $40,000 in federal funds, to be match with $20,000 locally, to build an airport administration building.

Three hundred fifty new telephones have been installed in the city area, said I. H. Anderson, NW manager.

The Times Record did not publish January 4 because of the severe blizzard.

W. Atkinson, Devils Lake, representing Travelers’ insurance Company, moved to Valley City.

Carl Katz took over management of City Drug.

Pat Morgan sold his interests in Dakota Press to C. C. Morgan and F. R, Crowe.

The Kindred Hotel was being redecorated, with 48 rooms to be refinished.

C. V. Money resigned as STC athletic director.

Woodrow Gagnon, Fargo, purchased the Royal Café from J. O. Botten and Charlie Howard.

Lloyd Triebold took over management of the California Fruit Store, buying the business from Jake Chulse.

Clayton Thayer sold Spike’s Liquor Place to Wendlin Mattern and Joe Haman, Grand Forks, for a reported $26,000.

Rail and bus transportation came to a standstill in a blinding February 9 storm.

A vocational agriculture department was established at VCHS.

Charles Challey, LaMoure, was to head the department.

For the first time, the Arena and two other buildings were used for the Winter Show, although construction was not complete.

The Co-op Coffee Shop was opened by manager Harvey Aman at West Front.

Nearly 100 city businessmen were guests of GNDA when colored movies of the Garrison project were shown by bill Sebens.

Valley city purchased a new Seagraves fire engine for over $12,000.

Harlow Stillings was feted on the 25th anniversary of service as a rural mail carrier.

The Country Club received free trees from E. C. Hilborn’s nursery for planting along the fairways and tees.

NW Telephone company employees were on picket lines to show strike unity.

The AP called Valley City’s newspaper situation a journalistic crisis as friends of the editor-publisher called him liberal and enemies labeled him as radical.

Dr. Max Moore was nominated as governor of Rotary’s 117th district.

Appointment of Willis Osmon and C. H. Bliss to the STC athletic department was announced.

Andy Risem sold his photography studio to R. Kenneth McFarland.

Don Matchan turned down an offer to sell the Times Record to a group of businessmen.

Everything is “set to go” for baldhill Dam construction, said Mayor Curtis Olson.

The Red Owl Super Market was modernized.  Wayne Drugan was manager.

The Snow White laundry was opened by Monroe Pottorff.

O. S. (Hub) Peterson was elected N. D. funeral Directors’ president.

U. S. engineers called for bids on stage one construction of Baldhill Dam.

Walter A. Jensen was elected president of the N. D. Frozen Locker Association.

Ulman Equipment Company was sold to Farmotors, Inc.

The Times Record was sold by don Matchan to Jerome Bjerke, Milton and James Wick and Owen Scott.

Violet Lutz opened the Gift Shoppe.

The first Lutheran congregation voted to build a new church on the present site.

Halloween pranksters tipped over the eight foot high fountain in City Park.

Valley City’s American Legion post purchased a 42 passenger school bus for use by the public.

An eight foot granite monument was dedicated on Armistice Day observance on city auditorium grounds.  Inscribed were the name of the 80 Barnes County men who died in WW II.

Alden Anderson, owner of Dakota Auto Supply Company, purchased the Peterson Oil Company building on Second Street NW and Second Avenue. The company wholesaled to automotive dealers in the area.

John Halverson, oldest living former postmaster of Valley City, marked his 93rd birthday anniversary.

Dr. Lloyd C, Carlson opened practice of optometry in Middlewest Bank building.

A $250,000 bond issue to remodel the public school building was approved by voters by a 90 percent yes vote.

With installation of electric conveyors, the Bignall Lumber Company was ready to serve customers with a complete line of coal.

Spillway excavation and embankment work was near completion at Baldhill Dam.

Edward McGee, the city’s oldest resident, marked his 99th birthday anniversary.

The new library in the senior high school was dedicated as a memorial to Miss Thelma Torkelson.

At age 24, Walt Jensen was the youngest man to be elected president of the N. D. Frozen food Locker Association.

The council signed a contract with Olaf Wick to construct a 60 x 150 foot swimming pool for about $65,000.

Nearly 5,000 attended the Farmers Merchants Picnic sponsored here by city merchants.

Bernard C. Lyons opened a law office in the Middlewest Bank building.

C. L. Fennel, Minneapolis, purchased Frank’s Café from Frank Oulton.

Ground breaking ceremonies were held at the Baldhill Dam Site August 4.  Machines that would carry up to 20 tons of earth each trip were brought to Baldhill as the $1,600,000 construction project got underway.

Billy Krause won the city croquet championship by defeating Karen Lydell.  Krause also won the juvenile golf title.  Bob King was second.

Mrs. Ruth Hamilton, Fargo, was named manager of Miller’s Ready To Wear store.

Memorial half-dollars, honoring Booker T. Washington, were on sale at the Times Record.

Helen Lorns, Valley City, became director of state examinations in the N. D. Department of Public Instruction.

The State Air Fair and Circus was held in the city August 27 and 5,000 visitors attended.

The Sheyenne Hospital Association dedicated the ground secured from Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Maier.

Frank Oulton purchased Percy Polyhar’s Dry Cleaning establishment.

Mrs. Clara Bechtle was elected president of N. D. County Auditors.

World War II veterans began cashing terminal leave bonds.

Snow White Laundry was sold to Oliver Esby and Edwin Johnson by Monroe Portorffs.

The reconditioned Valley Hotel Bowling Alleys opened.

“We are working hard to translate an ideal into a reality,” said Dr. H. L. Lokken, STC president, in dedicating the site where the proposed $300,000 Sheyenne Hospital is to be constructed.

Oliver Peterson purchased full interest in the Holberg-Peterson Funeral Home, renaming it Oliver’s Chapel.

 

1924 in Valley City

1924

State basketball tournament was awarded to Valley City to be held in the new college gym.

H. C. Bjerke came here from Bismarck as manager of the Russell-Miller Milling Plant

Margaret Engemoen, Valley City. Won sixth prize in the state essay contest, “How to Keep Boys and Girls on the Farm.”

Clifford C. McDonald became the sole owner of the dry cleaning establishment of McDonald and Murdock.

The college basketball squad, coached by L. G. Hurst, won all but one of their contests and was named conference champions.

W. H. Pray was elected mayor of Valley City.

Plans for the new Piller theatre were in the hands of John Piller with construction expected during the summer.

Mrs. Marie Spiker was elected Most Excellent Chief of the Pythian sisters as that group held its first meeting.

Charley Hokanson was named chief of police replacing Mr. Swanson.

The Bank of valley city, following reorganization, opened for business with K. A Bonhus, president, and Frank Cook, vice-president.

A permanent organization for the Greater North Dakota Association was formed with Herman Stern, president, Dr. S. N. Thams, Fargo, had purchased the dental business of Dr. W. N. Palmer, who was leaving for California.

Father John Baker was elevated to Right Reverend Monsignor by Pope Pius XI.

Barnes County Courthouse was gutted by fire so officials would conduct business from City Hall.  The courthouse was built in 1882 and the fire came on the 5oth birthday of Barnes County.

Robertson’s Women’s Wear had leased space on top of the vault of the Bank of Valley City to be occupied by Molly Olson’s millinery shop.  Olson’s space was utilized for a beauty parlor.  John Gavin resigned as division engineer of the highway commission.

Two gas masks, two fire extinguishers and a life net were added to the fire department equipment.

The Northern Pacific announced it had completed automatic block systems on the railroad from St. Paul to the west coast.

Henry Kniprath and Victor Vaupel bought J. H. Sampson’s lunchroom.

Valley City Drum and Bugle Corps

Valley City Drum and Bugle Corps

The American Legion Post No. 60 Drum and Bugle corps was fist organized in 1927 with Glen Levitt in charge.  It was officially sponsored by the Valley city Voiture of 40 and 8.

The first official appearance was at the funeral of Alfred J. Henry, a Grand Army of the Republic member and father of Post commander T. S. Henry on September 3, 1927.

Deactivated with the advent of World War Two, it was reactivated in 1947 under the direction of Adrian H. Pfusch, the only World War member and the Drum Major of the original Corps.  Under his able direction the group improved in quality and style and was designated the official musical organization of the North Dakota 40 and 8, as well as the official musical organization of the City of Valley City, which entitled them to some financial support from the city.  This enabled the Corps to purchase new uniforms and instruments.  The Corps had been self-supporting up to this time.

The Corps attended four National American Legion Conventions; Minneapolis, Mn in 1959, Miami Beach, Florida in 1961; Dallas Texas in 1964 and Atlanta, Georgia in 1969 ably representing North Dakota and Barnes County in each case.

The Corps was deactivated in 1970.

• Russell-Miller Milling Company

Russell-Miller Milling Company Russell-Milling company, whose operations became part of the Peavey Company in 1953, began in Valley city, North Dakota. In 1879, a milling pioneer named Hiram Walker built a small water powered mill on the Sheyenne River at Valley City. Flour milRussell-Miller Milling Company Russell-Milling company, whose operations became part of the Peavey Company in 1953, began in Valley city, North Dakota. In 1879, a milling pioneer named Hiram Walker built a small water powered mill on the Sheyenne River at Valley City. Flour milling as an industry was beginning to establish it importance in this area, and with more extensive railroad lines in the north and west, the great spring wheat of the Red River Valley in North and South Dakota was gaining in importance. John Russell, a native of New York brought his family to Southern Minnesota in 1855, and after farming in Fillmore County for several years, engaged in grain business at Rushford in 1862. As an outgrowth of his interest in the grain business, the firm of Russell, Jones & Honstine was formed in the 1870’s for the purpose of milling wheat flour. Russell, known familiarly as “Uncle John”, set the highest possible standards in everything he did, and tried to exceed his mark. He did not readily accept the usual way of doing things, but was constantly on the alert for new and better methods. In 1879 the call of the West lured John Russell to Valley city, North Dakota, following the building of the Northern Pacific Railway west from Fargo. He invested in farm land, served the fast developing community by shipping many carloads of horses and mules, and with two or three others, helped to organized the first bank in the country _ later to become the First National Bank of Valley City. Mr. Russell as president of the bank until his death in 1907. “Uncle John’s “ arrival in Valley City found another pioneer, Hiram Walker, operating a little saw mill on the Sheyenne River, cutting timber that fringed its bank and hewing logs with which to build a flour mill. In 1882, Mr. Russell invited his son-in-law, Arthur Miller, to form a partnership in operating the mill acquired from Walker. Miller, who had gained his milling experience from England, accepted responsibility as superintendent of the mill’s operations. An interest in a quality product and utilizing the best milling processes lead Mr. Miller to promptly replace old stone burrs with roller in the first improvement to the water powered plant. Next, the old water wheel was replaced with a steam engine. These alterations enable the mill to produce 175 barrels of hard wheat flour per day. In 1886 Russell and Miller took the first step in a series of expansions which would eventually make the company the fourth largest milling firm in the nation. This was the purchase of a second mill at Jamestown, North Dakota. Subsequently, the partnership was incorporated as Russell & Miller Milling Company. The brand name “Occident”, meaning “out of the West” was selected because milling operations were situated in what was then the extreme western area of wheat production. As the company’s milling capacity grew, its allied interest progressed. Increased milling meant more need for grain and thus, proper storage facilities. The Russell & Miller Milling company built its first grain elevator in the years between 1882 and 1892. Mr. Miller studied varieties of wheat and experimented continuously with blends and processes for separation and purification. The company produced such a superior flour that it was sought throughout the North Dakota Region. The firm of Russell & Miller Milling Company was reorganized again in 1897 this time as Russell-Miller Milling Company and E. P. Wells joined the firm as president in rapid succession mills were acquired as Russell-Miller rose in prominence in the milling industry. During the period that Mr. Wells headed the firm, research increased with the start of an experimental bakery for quality control and the development of new methods of bakery production. A research kitchen for product development and test was also established to operate jointly with the bakery. By 1906 Russell-Miller’s capacity was 8,000 hundred weights (cwts). It had experienced fires both in Jamestown and Valley City, rebuilding these mills and constructing a new mill at Minot, North Dakota. In 1907 the company’s headquarters moved to Minneapolis where it built a major mill to take advantage of the tremendous stock of select wheat. This move further assured the high quality of “Occident” flour. The company continued to grow; 100 cwt mills were erected at Sidney and billing, Montana, and the Missouri Valley Milling Company was purchased with mills in Bismarck, Mandan and Dickinson, North Dakota. A second mille was built in Valley City and a production record for that era was established there when the two units produced 56,284 barrels of four in one month. The grain facilities were expanded by acquiring properties of the Lyon Elevator Company and Ireys Elevator Company. Harry S. Helm became the third president of Russell-Miller Milling Company in 1918. During this time the Valley City “Occident” mills ran for 61 consecutive days – full 24 hours _ without a minute’s shutdown; and 116 consecutive days with a total shutdown of only 17 hours and 30 minutes. Another company record was established when the Minot, North Dakota mill operated 318 consecutive 24 hour days in one calendar year. A line of country elevators was built in the billings areas during this time, while at Grand Forks, North Dakota, a frame mill was torn down and replaced with a new brick mill in 29 days. This was also the era when trucks replaced horse drawn wagons for flour delivery. In 1919 the Minneapolis milling operation were increased to a capacity of 11,000cwts. The firm moved eastward out of its traditional territory in 1924, building a 3,600 cwt mill in Buffalo, New York. The older half of the Minneapolis mill was then closed as were the mils in Jamestown, Bismarck and Dickinson, as the remaining mills were enlarged. Russell-Miller acquired Everett, Aughenbugh & Company in 1925 and while the mills of this old western Minnesota business were never operated, the E-A company brands were retained. In 1932 a feed plant was opened to manufacture some 40 types of commercial feed for livestock and poultry. These feeds – made from Montana grains and some 30 other materials from other sections of the United States – were distributed throughout Central Montana and northern Wyoming. C. G. Ireys became the company’s fourth president in 1939. Until 1941 Russell-Miller had concentrated its operation in the spring wheat area; with the acquisition of Stanard-Tilton Milling Company of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1942 Leslie F. Miller (son of Arthur Miller) became the fifth president of Russell-Miller. Fire destroyed the mill at Alton, Illinois, which was later rebuilt to be the largest of the Russell-Miller mills. The company’s services were further expanded when an insecticide plant was built in 1948 to produce dusts for spraying. When liquid chemicals began replacing the dust, the plant was rebuilt and in 1951 was ready to handle the processing of seeds. While the four side of Russell-Miller’s business was growing, the company was also developing its country and terminal elevator division which purchased millions of bushels of wheat from North Dakota farmers, primarily as a source of supply to the mills. By 1953 Russell-Miller had 143 country elevators, some of which had expanded to include coal, lumber, and gasoline supplies for the farmers whose grain they took in Montana and North Dakota. The division had also begun operation of a seed house in North Dakota and two feed merchandising plants in North Dakota and Montana. The elevator divisions were operating large terminals to facilitate the movement of grain in Minneapolis and Buffalo, New York. In 1954, control of Russell-Miller Company was acquired by Peavey Company, and George W. P. Heffelfinger became Russell-Miller’s sixth president. Russell-Miller was the first milling company in the country to depart from the norm of packaging flour in white bags. In 1955, the company began packing their four in a newly designed orange bag. In 1960, Russell-Miller became a Peavey division under the name of Russell-Miller-King Midas Mills, and in 1963 the division name was again changed to Peavey Company Flour Mills. These milling operation were all a part of Peavey’s Industrial Food Group. Peavey was one of the country’s largest flour millers and a leading producer of durum products for the pasta industry. In addition to bakery flour, the company had Occident, King Midas and Hungarian brands available for the consumer. To read me, take time to read these links. http://www.flickr.com/photos/23711298@N07/sets/72157625363229411/ http://foodcompanycookbooks.blogspot.com/2006/12/occident-flour-milling.html http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/ConAgra-Inc-Company-History.html ling as an industry was beginning to establish it importance in this area, and with more extensive railroad lines in the north and west, the great spring wheat of the Red River Valley in North and South Dakota was gaining in importance. John Russell, a native of New York brought his family to Southern Minnesota in 1855, and after farming in Fillmore County for several years, engaged in grain business at Rushford in 1862. As an outgrowth of his interest in the grain business, the firm of Russell, Jones & Honstine was formed in the 1870’s for the purpose of milling wheat flour. Russell, known familiarly as “Uncle John”, set the highest possible standards in everything he did, and tried to exceed his mark. He did not readily accept the usual way of doing things, but was constantly on the alert for new and better methods. In 1879 the call of the West lured John Russell to Valley city, North Dakota, following the building of the Northern Pacific Railway west from Fargo. He invested in farm land, served the fast developing community by shipping many carloads of horses and mules, and with two or three others, helped to organized the first bank in the country _ later to become the First National Bank of Valley City. Mr. Russell as president of the bank until his death in 1907. “Uncle John’s “ arrival in Valley City found another pioneer, Hiram Walker, operating a little saw mill on the Sheyenne River, cutting timber that fringed its bank and hewing logs with which to build a flour mill. In 1882, Mr. Russell invited his son-in-law, Arthur Miller, to form a partnership in operating the mill acquired from Walker. Miller, who had gained his milling experience from England, accepted responsibility as superintendent of the mill’s operations. An interest in a quality product and utilizing the best milling processes lead Mr. Miller to promptly replace old stone burrs with roller in the first improvement to the water powered plant. Next, the old water wheel was replaced with a steam engine. These alterations enable the mill to produce 175 barrels of hard wheat flour per day. In 1886 Russell and Miller took the first step in a series of expansions which would eventually make the company the fourth largest milling firm in the nation. This was the purchase of a second mill at Jamestown, North Dakota. Subsequently, the partnership was incorporated as Russell & Miller Milling Company. The brand name “Occident”, meaning “out of the West” was selected because milling operations were situated in what was then the extreme western area of wheat production. As the company’s milling capacity grew, its allied interest progressed. Increased milling meant more need for grain and thus, proper storage facilities. The Russell & Miller Milling company built its first grain elevator in the years between 1882 and 1892. Mr. Miller studied varieties of wheat and experimented continuously with blends and processes for separation and purification. The company produced such a superior flour that it was sought throughout the North Dakota Region. The firm of Russell & Miller Milling Company was reorganized again in 1897 this time as Russell-Miller Milling Company and E. P. Wells joined the firm as president in rapid succession mills were acquired as Russell-Miller rose in prominence in the milling industry. During the period that Mr. Wells headed the firm, research increased with the start of an experimental bakery for quality control and the development of new methods of bakery production. A research kitchen for product development and test was also established to operate jointly with the bakery. By 1906 Russell-Miller’s capacity was 8,000 hundred weights (cwts). It had experienced fires both in Jamestown and Valley City, rebuilding these mills and constructing a new mill at Minot, North Dakota. In 1907 the company’s headquarters moved to Minneapolis where it built a major mill to take advantage of the tremendous stock of select wheat. This move further assured the high quality of “Occident” flour. The company continued to grow; 100 cwt mills were erected at Sidney and billing, Montana, and the Missouri Valley Milling Company was purchased with mills in Bismarck, Mandan and Dickinson, North Dakota. A second mille was built in Valley City and a production record for that era was established there when the two units produced 56,284 barrels of four in one month. The grain facilities were expanded by acquiring properties of the Lyon Elevator Company and Ireys Elevator Company. Harry S. Helm became the third president of Russell-Miller Milling Company in 1918. During this time the Valley City “Occident” mills ran for 61 consecutive days – full 24 hours _ without a minute’s shutdown; and 116 consecutive days with a total shutdown of only 17 hours and 30 minutes. Another company record was established when the Minot, North Dakota mill operated 318 consecutive 24 hour days in one calendar year. A line of country elevators was built in the billings areas during this time, while at Grand Forks, North Dakota, a frame mill was torn down and replaced with a new brick mill in 29 days. This was also the era when trucks replaced horse drawn wagons for flour delivery. In 1919 the Minneapolis milling operation were increased to a capacity of 11,000cwts. The firm moved eastward out of its traditional territory in 1924, building a 3,600 cwt mill in Buffalo, New York. The older half of the Minneapolis mill was then closed as were the mils in Jamestown, Bismarck and Dickinson, as the remaining mills were enlarged. Russell-Miller acquired Everett, Aughenbugh & Company in 1925 and while the mills of this old western Minnesota business were never operated, the E-A company brands were retained. In 1932 a feed plant was opened to manufacture some 40 types of commercial feed for livestock and poultry. These feeds – made from Montana grains and some 30 other materials from other sections of the United States – were distributed throughout Central Montana and northern Wyoming. C. G. Ireys became the company’s fourth president in 1939. Until 1941 Russell-Miller had concentrated its operation in the spring wheat area; with the acquisition of Stanard-Tilton Milling Company of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1942 Leslie F. Miller (son of Arthur Miller) became the fifth president of Russell-Miller. Fire destroyed the mill at Alton, Illinois, which was later rebuilt to be the largest of the Russell-Miller mills. The company’s services were further expanded when an insecticide plant was built in 1948 to produce dusts for spraying. When liquid chemicals began replacing the dust, the plant was rebuilt and in 1951 was ready to handle the processing of seeds. While the four side of Russell-Miller’s business was growing, the company was also developing its country and terminal elevator division which purchased millions of bushels of wheat from North Dakota farmers, primarily as a source of supply to the mills. By 1953 Russell-Miller had 143 country elevators, some of which had expanded to include coal, lumber, and gasoline supplies for the farmers whose grain they took in Montana and North Dakota. The division had also begun operation of a seed house in North Dakota and two feed merchandising plants in North Dakota and Montana. The elevator divisions were operating large terminals to facilitate the movement of grain in Minneapolis and Buffalo, New York. In 1954, control of Russell-Miller Company was acquired by Peavey Company, and George W. P. Heffelfinger became Russell-Miller’s sixth president. Russell-Miller was the first milling company in the country to depart from the norm of packaging flour in white bags. In 1955, the company began packing their four in a newly designed orange bag. In 1960, Russell-Miller became a Peavey division under the name of Russell-Miller-King Midas Mills, and in 1963 the division name was again changed to Peavey Company Flour Mills. These milling operation were all a part of Peavey’s Industrial Food Group. Peavey was one of the country’s largest flour millers and a leading producer of durum products for the pasta industry. In addition to bakery flour, the company had Occident, King Midas and Hungarian brands available for the consumer. To read me, take time to read these links. http://www.flickr.com/photos/23711298@N07/sets/72157625363229411/ http://foodcompanycookbooks.blogspot.com/2006/12/occident-flour-milling.html http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/ConAgra-Inc-Company-History.html

Western Hotel

Western Hotel

According to Con Schweinler, an early settler who came to
the valley in 1874 and settled south of Valley City (then known as “Second
Crossing”) he found a hotel being conducted in a tent, there being no building
other than the section house.  In the
front end of this hotel, James Morrison sold calico and sugar as well as the
meals which Donald D. McFadgen cooked in the back end of the tent.  There were sleeping bunks along the
sidewalls.  The establishment was known
as “The Western Hotel”.  Others have
indicated that Donald D. McFadgen did not do the cooking but that a man by the
name of Richard McKinnon was in partnership with James Morrison.  The Andreas Atlas, the first atlas of the
Dakotas, notes that it was Donald D. McFadgen and McKinnon who had the hotel.

Where can one get a new court house for the sum of $529.89?

Where can one get a new court house for the sum of $529.89?

That was the total cost of the first Barnes County Court House.  Situated about where the county jail now stands, the building was authorized on July 29, 1879 by the First Board of county Commissioners.

The contract for the construction of the new building was let to D. D. McFadgen, then the first sheriff.  Perhaps there was a conflict of interest here, but it was more probable that carpenters were hard to come by and the sheriff had little to do since the total population of the county did not exceed 1500.

The following October 6th the commissioners allowed the payment for the following bills for the erection of the building:  D. D. McFadgen, Labor $139.45, Walter F. Jones, lumber $284.48; L. L. Humble, painting $6.40 and H. G. Hourne, paints and oils, $12. 42.

The Clerk of Court occupied the upper story, reached by an outside stairway.  The remainder of the County Officials shared the one big room on the first floor.  Most of their business, however, was conducted from their business or shops or farms, or from their vest pockets, as the case might be.

With the rapid growth of the county and the many land transactions, more space was needed and in 1883 a new court house was authorized by a vote of the people and bonds were to b e issued in the amount of $35,000.This amount was to be used to build the new court house and to refund the county indebtedness.

The bonds were duly sold and when the money was received, the County Treasurer, A. M. Pease, absconded with the bond money and all the taxes that had been collected.  He was never apprehended and the money was never recovered.  However, the Treasurer was bonded and the money recovered from the bonding agents, and the building of the court house went forward.

With the completion of the new court house, the old structure was used as a storehouse for a time but then finally sold and moved onto the block north of the court house block, where it was used as a bar first and then as a garage.

Upon the death of Mrs. Musselman, who owned the property, the building was sold to a Mr. Bjornson, who moved it to his far.  Mr. Paul Bjornson then used it as a horse stable until in the 1950’s when it was again sold to Mr. Walter Vanurden, who moved it to his farm west of the city on old highway 10.  There some eighty years after it glorious beginning, it was torn down to make room for a modern steel building.

Where can one get a new court house for the sum of $529.89?

That was the total cost of the first Barnes County Court House.  Situated about where the county jail now stands, the building was authorized on July 29, 1879 by the First Board of county Commissioners.

The contract for the construction of the new building was let to D. D. McFadgen, then the first sheriff.  Perhaps there was a conflict of interest here, but it was more probable that carpenters were hard to come by and the sheriff had little to do since the total population of the county did not exceed 1500.

The following October 6th the commissioners allowed the payment for the following bills for the erection of the building:  D. D. McFadgen, Labor $139.45, Walter F. Jones, lumber $284.48; L. L. Humble, painting $6.40 and H. G. Hourne, paints and oils, $12. 42.

The Clerk of Court occupied the upper story, reached by an outside stairway.  The remainder of the County Officials shared the one big room on the first floor.  Most of their business, however, was conducted from their business or shops or farms, or from their vest pockets, as the case might be.

With the rapid growth of the county and the many land transactions, more space was needed and in 1883 a new court house was authorized by a vote of the people and bonds were to b e issued in the amount of $35,000.This amount was to be used to build the new court house and to refund the county indebtedness.

The bonds were duly sold and when the money was received, the County Treasurer, A. M. Pease, absconded with the bond money and all the taxes that had been collected.  He was never apprehended and the money was never recovered.  However, the Treasurer was bonded and the money recovered from the bonding agents, and the building of the court house went forward.

With the completion of the new court house, the old structure was used as a storehouse for a time but then finally sold and moved onto the block north of the court house block, where it was used as a bar first and then as a garage.

Upon the death of Mrs. Musselman, who owned the property, the building was sold to a Mr. Bjornson, who moved it to his far.  Mr. Paul Bjornson then used it as a horse stable until in the 1950’s when it was again sold to Mr. Walter Vanurden, who moved it to his farm west of the city on old highway 10.  There some eighty years after it glorious beginning, it was torn down to make room for a modern steel building.

Where can one get a new court house for the sum of $529.89?

That was the total cost of the first Barnes County Court House.  Situated about where the county jail now stands, the building was authorized on July 29, 1879 by the First Board of county Commissioners.

The contract for the construction of the new building was let to D. D. McFadgen, then the first sheriff.  Perhaps there was a conflict of interest here, but it was more probable that carpenters were hard to come by and the sheriff had little to do since the total population of the county did not exceed 1500.

The following October 6th the commissioners allowed the payment for the following bills for the erection of the building:  D. D. McFadgen, Labor $139.45, Walter F. Jones, lumber $284.48; L. L. Humble, painting $6.40 and H. G. Hourne, paints and oils, $12. 42.

The Clerk of Court occupied the upper story, reached by an outside stairway.  The remainder of the County Officials shared the one big room on the first floor.  Most of their business, however, was conducted from their business or shops or farms, or from their vest pockets, as the case might be.

With the rapid growth of the county and the many land transactions, more space was needed and in 1883 a new court house was authorized by a vote of the people and bonds were to b e issued in the amount of $35,000.This amount was to be used to build the new court house and to refund the county indebtedness.

The bonds were duly sold and when the money was received, the County Treasurer, A. M. Pease, absconded with the bond money and all the taxes that had been collected.  He was never apprehended and the money was never recovered.  However, the Treasurer was bonded and the money recovered from the bonding agents, and the building of the court house went forward.

With the completion of the new court house, the old structure was used as a storehouse for a time but then finally sold and moved onto the block north of the court house block, where it was used as a bar first and then as a garage.

Upon the death of Mrs. Musselman, who owned the property, the building was sold to a Mr. Bjornson, who moved it to his far.  Mr. Paul Bjornson then used it as a horse stable until in the 1950’s when it was again sold to Mr. Walter Vanurden, who moved it to his farm west of the city on old highway 10.  There some eighty years after it glorious beginning, it was torn down to make room for a modern steel building.

Barnes County’s First Hotel

Barnes County’s First Hotel

Perhaps the most popular place in the early village of Valley City was its one and only hotel, The Valley City Hotel.

Located on Third Avenue southeast just north of what was Green Valley Laundry, the hotel was for a time the center of all activity in the village.  Both the famous and the unknown stopped here and many an early settler spent his or her first night in Barnes County in this hotel.

The proprietors were Mr. and Mrs. Hanson and their two daughters, Fannie and Hulda.  Here one could get a full meal for twenty five cents and all the coffee one could drink.  While the rooms were small by today’s standards, they were as comfortable as the times allowed.

It was the noon dinner stops over for passengers on the Northern pacific before the dining car appeared on the railroad scene.  The depot at the time was located at the upper end of the street and the hotel was only a short walk away from the train as it stopped.

Somewhat later another hotel, the Sherman House, was built but its clients were mainly the commercial travelers and the Valley City Hotel remained the social center of the village.  Dances were held here as well as amateur play practices.

In April of 1880 the Sherman House which had been owned by Charley Hokanson, changed hands and in the same month the Valley city Hotel closed its doors due to the owners having decided to go farming.  The hotel did reopen but under other management in the fall and later the Hansons resumed the management.  However, with the building of several other small hotels and the famed Kindred Hotel in 1884 the Valley City Hotel passed out of existence.

As is usually the case, the building became a rooming house and was such for many years until it was torn down sometime in the 1950’sl  If its walls could have talked , the stories would have made good listening!