Posts from the ‘Year Highlight’ Category

1942

1942
Sale of new cars and trucks were prohibited throughout the nation.
“Production for Victory” was the slogan for the 1942 Winter Show.
Joe Straus sold his dry cleaning plant to Oscar Dahl and Anton Vandrovec.
The S :& L Store building was remodeled.
“War Times” was adopted with clocks moved up one hour early in February.
Rationed sales of recapped and retreaded tires were ordered.
Dr. Paul Cook discontinued private practice to become District Health Officer.
Valley City’s WPA office was closed.
Mrs. Sarah Tooley marked her 102nd birthday anniversary.
Baldhill Dam approval was expected.
A 215 foot KOVC tower crumbled and crashed through the roof of Hotel Rudolph during a March Blizzard.
The city airport met requirements for defense funds.
Valley City staged an Army Day parade April t.
Fred Fredrickson, mayor for 14 years, was re elected.
Mrs. Sarah Tooley died April 13.
John Heimes was elected Winter Show president.
Sugar rationing registrars met in the city.
Work was underway to enlarge the city airport.
Naval V-1 and Air Training programs began at STC.
Oliver Peterson was named president of the N. D. Funeral Directors.
The Sheyenne Valley Rodeo and Horse Show were sponsored in the city.
A drive was underway to collect old rubber.
Three truckers were arrested in the city for overloading their vehicles.
Dr. E. H. Kleinpell became president of STC.
A parade opened a Valley City War Bond Sale drive.
“White Collar” individuals registered for farm work.
Southern Barnes County harvested the best crop for several years.
Clarence Roughton was elected N. D. Jaycee president. Eugene bong was district president.
Valley City measured 7.37 inches of rain in August.
Gasoline rationing regulations were spelled out by FDR.
Piller Theater gave a free ticket for each War Bond purchased and gave tickets for 30 days to the woman selling the most bonds in a campaign.
Hanna Field was dedicated October 16. The ceremony set for Sept 25 had to be postponed because of heavy snows.
Reynold Stewart, formerly of the city, was named personnel manager for Montgomery Ward.
Married men with a family faced armed forces draft, it was announced.
Intersection street “buttons” each weighing 25 pounds were contributed to the scrap iron collection. Iron grills on post office windows were also given in the drive.
A “sparkling” parade opened “Retailers for Victory Bond Drive.”
War factories did not shut down on July 4.
Mayor Fred Fredrickson went ot Washington, D. C. to represent state business interest in developing state resources and federal war projects in North Dakota. Curtis Olson became acting city mayor.
Three cannons displayed in the city were donated for scrap iron.
American Heroes Day began with a breakfast at the Rudolf Hotel to spur purchases of War Bonds. A total of $33,000 was subscribed.
A drive for old phonograph records to be processed into new plates and sent to armed forces stations.
Quota for the city Legion post was 9,400 records.
STC students were eligible for the Reserve Corps.
North Dakota gasoline rationing began November 9, 1942.
Ten thousand persons attended the city Rodeo and Horse Show. A free carnival was a feature.
Long underwear was a “hot” number for winter as thermostats were ordered to be set low.
Milk prices were increased to 12 cents per quart.
A Victory Garden Show and State Style Show were sponsored. Coffee sales halted for one week, rationing began November 28. A house –to – house campaign outlined the “share the meat” campaign. The 1943 Winter Show was reduced to three days to meet war-time conditions. A “Victory Bucks” auction raised Bonds funds. A cream can sold for $500.00.
Valley City scored 100 percent in a Midwest Blackout December 4, 1942. Tom Brown was city director as all light were turned out at 10 p. m.
STC offered pre-flight training.
An office of Defense Transportation opened here.
An AAA mobilization meeting was held to plan 1942 grain production

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1941

1941
Four howitzers were stored in the city and later assigned to artillery units. Company G was mobilized February 10 spent 10 days in the armory and then went to Camp Claiborne, Louisiana for training.
National Tea Company opened a supermarket in a new building.
Frank Luessen was Jaycee man of the year.
The Gambles Store opened in a new location on upper Fifth Avenue.
A baby chick show, egg grading courses and a rural spelling contest were planned for the 1941 winter show.
Beginning March 1, city stores were open until 9 p.m. Saturdays.
Gov. John Moses broadcasted an address from the auditorium banquet hall to open the Winter show.
A special train from Cooperstown brought show visitors.
A sudden storm March 15 brought death to 39 North Dakotans, including four from the city area.
The city airport was seen as a vital link in an expanding aviation program.
A.M. Olson purchased the Springdale Dairy from Mrs. C. S. Webster.
The raging Sheyenne River flooded a large section of the area north of the city. Major J. W. Moreland, army engineer, arrived by train to study flood damage.
State Funeral Directors held their convention here.
A new “White Way” was assured for the city.
The Jaycees planted peony beds along the highway into the city.
A four day WPA sewing train institute was held in the city, over $67,000 was approved for a city airport hangar and improvements.
Valley Motor Company, Chrysler dealership, opened in the city.
Grand Assembly of Rainbow Girls brought over 300 here.
The City joined in June Dairy Month observances, including a milking contest.
Northwest Stavanger Lag convened here.
The Hardanger Lag also met here.
Jackie Anderson, 16, saved two sisters from drowning.
The Sheyenne Valley Roundup and Festival was sponsored.
Valley City began a campaign to gather aluminum in response to FDR’s appeal.
Crops and buildings were damaged in a wind hail storm.
A USO drive raised $1,200.
A delegation from the Great Plains section of the American Society for Horticultural Science toured area tree plantings.
A delegation of Sioux Indians from Cannonball came for the Roundup celebration in the city. There were 30 wild broncos brought for the event which opened with balloon ascension. An 85 car caravan from Fargo visited the celebration. It was estimated 15,000 people came during the festival.
The Federal Fish Hatchery shipped 10,000 fish to western counties and South Dakota.
Over $60,000 was offered for livestock at Harrington’s weekly sale.
Baldhill Dam was the topic at a meeting in Grand Forks.
The Duke and Duchess of Windsor stopped in the city enroute to Calgary.
There were 1,500 exhibits for the Corn and Lamb show.
Bank debits set a September record in Valley City, Totaling $1,758,000.
STC enrollment for the fall term was 438, down 24 percent from 1940.
A new city parking lot was opened at Thrid Avenue and Third Street.
Axel Gregerson, 17, was injured when he fell from a load of coal at Wilton.
Offices of Northwest Nursery moved to a new bulding on Chautauqua Blvd.
Valley City was “dressed up” for Yule with colored lights, and stars.
The Times Record had bold headlines December 8 to tell about the attack on Pearl Harbor and the United States declaration of war.
Home Guards were posted on the Hi-Line bridge.
New tire sales were banned late in December.
Seventy four signed for the city Home Guard.
A red Owl supermarket opened on upper Fifth Avenue.
STC organized for war bonds.1941
Four howitzers were stored in the city and later assigned to artillery units. Company G was mobilized February 10 spent 10 days in the armory and then went to Camp Claiborne, Louisiana for training.
National Tea Company opened a supermarket in a new building.
Frank Luessen was Jaycee man of the year.
The Gambles Store opened in a new location on upper Fifth Avenue.
A baby chick show, egg grading courses and a rural spelling contest were planned for the 1941 winter show.
Beginning March 1, city stores were open until 9 p.m. Saturdays.
Gov. John Moses broadcasted an address from the auditorium banquet hall to open the Winter show.
A special train from Cooperstown brought show visitors.
A sudden storm March 15 brought death to 39 North Dakotans, including four from the city area.
The city airport was seen as a vital link in an expanding aviation program.
A.M. Olson purchased the Springdale Dairy from Mrs. C. S. Webster.
The raging Sheyenne River flooded a large section of the area north of the city. Major J. W. Moreland, army engineer, arrived by train to study flood damage.
State Funeral Directors held their convention here.
A new “White Way” was assured for the city.
The Jaycees planted peony beds along the highway into the city.
A four day WPA sewing train institute was held in the city, over $67,000 was approved for a city airport hangar and improvements.
Valley Motor Company, Chrysler dealership, opened in the city.
Grand Assembly of Rainbow Girls brought over 300 here.
The City joined in June Dairy Month observances, including a milking contest.
Northwest Stavanger Lag convened here.
The Hardanger Lag also met here.
Jackie Anderson, 16, saved two sisters from drowning.
The Sheyenne Valley Roundup and Festival was sponsored.
Valley City began a campaign to gather aluminum in response to FDR’s appeal.
Crops and buildings were damaged in a wind hail storm.
A USO drive raised $1,200.
A delegation from the Great Plains section of the American Society for Horticultural Science toured area tree plantings.
A delegation of Sioux Indians from Cannonball came for the Roundup celebration in the city. There were 30 wild broncos brought for the event which opened with balloon ascension. An 85 car caravan from Fargo visited the celebration. It was estimated 15,000 people came during the festival.
The Federal Fish Hatchery shipped 10,000 fish to western counties and South Dakota.
Over $60,000 was offered for livestock at Harrington’s weekly sale.
Baldhill Dam was the topic at a meeting in Grand Forks.
The Duke and Duchess of Windsor stopped in the city enroute to Calgary.
There were 1,500 exhibits for the Corn and Lamb show.
Bank debits set a September record in Valley City, Totaling $1,758,000.
STC enrollment for the fall term was 438, down 24 percent from 1940.
A new city parking lot was opened at Thrid Avenue and Third Street.
Axel Gregerson, 17, was injured when he fell from a load of coal at Wilton.
Offices of Northwest Nursery moved to a new bulding on Chautauqua Blvd.
Valley City was “dressed up” for Yule with colored lights, and stars.
The Times Record had bold headlines December 8 to tell about the attack on Pearl Harbor and the United States declaration of war.
Home Guards were posted on the Hi-Line bridge.
New tire sales were banned late in December.
Seventy four signed for the city Home Guard.
A red Owl supermarket opened on upper Fifth Avenue.
STC organized for war bonds.

1940

1940

Dr. Paul cook returned to practice medicine in offices of the late Dr. Will Moore. Cook was a five time North Dakota golf champion.

Dr. E. Z. Hackle, Jamestown, came to practice in the quarter of the late Dr. E. Pray.

The Gamble Robinson plant was improved. Banana storage rooms were enlarged.

A Finnish relief drives was sponsored.

Lessons in salesmanship were given at VCHS. There was a livestock judging school at the sales pavilion.

Mrs. Sarah Tooley was 100 years of age March 18. She had been 20 2h3n the Civil War began.

Harrington’s dedicated a new N. P. stockyard and sales pavilion.

City voters rejected a proposed park levey increase from two to three mills.

The Winter Show had become a “fixed institution,” directors agreed.

Voters rejected a proposal for a municipal liquor store.

A robbery attempt at Penney’s was foiled b a woman’s screams.

There were 1,000 at YCL rally in the city.

A $30,000 rendering plant was built near the city.

W. E. Atkinson also purchased the 500 acre Rasmussen farm for his operations.

City Elks marked their 32nd anniversary.

STC celebrated its Golden Jubilee.

E. J. Pegg was elected vice president of the N. D. Automobile Club.

A WPA grant of $76,538 was made for a school athletic field on Fourth Avenue.

Nels A. Johnson retired as manager of Russell Miller Milling Company, after 37 years of service.

Grain was damaged by searing heat and scanty summer moisture.

Valley City had a 98 degree reading July 22.

I.J. Moe was an independent candidate for the U. S. Senate against William Langer.

Wendell Wilkie made a five minute stop in the city September 25 while campaigning for the U. S. presidency.

Jaycees gave away a “baby” during the Corn and Lamb Show.

Jeanne Ells, San Haven, joined Dr. A. W. Macdonald in medical practice.

North Dakota Nurses’ Association met in the city. They were joined by members of the Public Health Nurses Division.

A federal food stamp plan was put into operation Oct. 21.

National Tea moved their food market to a new building on upper 5th Avenue (Central Avenue).

An Artillery Battery was organized in the city by the Guard. Draft Board members were appointed. Alvin Milton Olson, Valley City had draft No. 1.

Holiday Bros. opened a grocery in a new building.

The Woolworth Store and Toring Jewelry were in the same structure.

Sixty coal dealers and coal customers conferred in Rudolf Hotel.

Norman Potter, Rogers, drove Stewart to victory in the seventh Turkey Derby.

A new Mercy Hospital Nurses’ Home was completed near the hospital.

Leslie Wicks won a trip to the 4-H Congress in Chicago.1940

Dr. Paul cook returned to practice medicine in offices of the late Dr. Will Moore. Cook was a five time North Dakota golf champion.

Dr. E. Z. Hackle, Jamestown, came to practice in the quarter of the late Dr. E. Pray.

The Gamble Robinson plant was improved. Banana storage rooms were enlarged.

A Finnish relief drives was sponsored.

Lessons in salesmanship were given at VCHS. There was a livestock judging school at the sales pavilion.

Mrs. Sarah Tooley was 100 years of age March 18. She had been 20 2h3n the Civil War began.

Harrington’s dedicated a new N. P. stockyard and sales pavilion.

City voters rejected a proposed park levey increase from two to three mills.

The Winter Show had become a “fixed institution,” directors agreed.

Voters rejected a proposal for a municipal liquor store.

A robbery attempt at Penney’s was foiled b a woman’s screams.

There were 1,000 at YCL rally in the city.

A $30,000 rendering plant was built near the city.

W. E. Atkinson also purchased the 500 acre Rasmussen farm for his operations.

City Elks marked their 32nd anniversary.

STC celebrated its Golden Jubilee.

E. J. Pegg was elected vice president of the N. D. Automobile Club.

A WPA grant of $76,538 was made for a school athletic field on Fourth Avenue.

Nels A. Johnson retired as manager of Russell Miller Milling Company, after 37 years of service.

Grain was damaged by searing heat and scanty summer moisture.

Valley City had a 98 degree reading July 22.

I.J. Moe was an independent candidate for the U. S. Senate against William Langer.

Wendell Wilkie made a five minute stop in the city September 25 while campaigning for the U. S. presidency.

Jaycees gave away a “baby” during the Corn and Lamb Show.

Jeanne Ells, San Haven, joined Dr. A. W. Macdonald in medical practice.

North Dakota Nurses’ Association met in the city. They were joined by members of the Public Health Nurses Division.

A federal food stamp plan was put into operation Oct. 21.

National Tea moved their food market to a new building on upper 5th Avenue (Central Avenue).

An Artillery Battery was organized in the city by the Guard. Draft Board members were appointed. Alvin Milton Olson, Valley City had draft No. 1.

Holiday Bros. opened a grocery in a new building.

The Woolworth Store and Toring Jewelry were in the same structure.

Sixty coal dealers and coal customers conferred in Rudolf Hotel.

Norman Potter, Rogers, drove Stewart to victory in the seventh Turkey Derby.

A new Mercy Hospital Nurses’ Home was completed near the hospital.

Leslie Wicks won a trip to the 4-H Congress in Chicago.

1939

1939
The North Dakota Cheese Company, only plant in the state, opened in the city through civic and Commerce club sponsorship. The plant had three milk routes.
A four car soils and Crops N. Pl. Train was in the city.
Stores would be open until 9 p. m. Saturdays, it was announced.
Baldhill Dam construction was urged at a hearing in Fargo.
Cement was poured for the city auditorium floor to prepare for Winter show activities. Pegg’s storage garage and the new armory were to be used. Winter Show advance tickets sales had response from service clubs and Rudolf Hotel. The Steinbach trained stallions show was a Winter Show feature.
Mark Connolly resigned as Winter show and Civic secretary.
A.M. Paulson was appointed.
Five hundred persons were in American Legion drum and bugle corps competition at the Legion convention here. Other conventions hosted were North Central Eagles, State Music Festival, 40 et 8, Church of Nazarene, State Horticulture Society, N. D Council of Christian Educators and two Norwegian “lags”. Gov. John Moses spoke at the Norse gatherings.
Our Savior’s Lutheran constructed a new church.
Paul Sherman purchased interests of Matt Krogh in Sherman Clothing Company.
A Harrington Bros. livestock sale had volume of $16,300.
Poison bait for a war on grasshoppers was distributed.
Twenty two percent of North Dakota’s population was on relief.
A million bass were to be hatched in the $96,000 federal fish hatchery. There were 35 acres under water at the plant.
Jack Benny visited in the city. “Keep eating what I am selling, he said.
GNDA’s 15th annual meeting was held in Valley City. Herman Stern, reelected as president, recalled that Valley City’s Town Criers had originated GNDA.
Crop returns were the largest in five years.
Over 600 out of state vehicles were counted entering the city in one August day.
Opinions differed as FDR proclaimed an earlier Thanksgiving Day.
Golden Jubilee of Church and Character Builders was held at the Congregational Church.
North Dakota 50th anniversary buttons designed by Thomas Elliott, were ready for jubilee observances Sept 21-27.
Straus purchased a store in Fargo. Eddie Stern was to be manager.
Ham and Eggs, driven by Jake Rhode, Rogers, won over Hitler in the annual N. D. Turkey Derby.
Montgomery Ward enlarged their city store.
There were 1,800 AAA committeemen at the Winter Show.
There were 300,000 pounds of turkey shipped from the city.
An Eastedge framer, Vincent Zacharias, received $634 for 271 birds.
A “heat Wave” December 6 brought the reading to 63 degrees.
Valley City was the only city in North Dakota to be in full compliance with federal milk ordinances and codes.

1938

1938
State GAR and WRC conventions bought 100 persons to Valley City. Over 1,000 from three states came to a Norwegian lag. Conventions of the Post Office League and Rural Carriers brought 1,000. The N. D. Jaycee convention brought 200. Five hundred social workers conferred in the city. Fifty hotelmen came to a convention here. North Dakota Bankers convention opened with a General Mills show, 300 attended. A state welfare session had 200 registered. Hundreds were here for a N. D. Luther League convention.
Governor William Langer opened the first Winter Show broadcasting from the exposition floor.
Senator Gerald Pl Nye was at the show.
Fred Aandahl, Litchville, was NDWS president.
Furs and cash were taken from Janiske’s Fur Store by two men and two women in a hold up.
The McCormick Deering firm became known as Geisler Implement, operated by Alan and LeGrande Geisler.
Fairmont added 200 storage lockers to its plant.
The American Legion purchased a main Street lot for a Post home.
The K. P. Lodge purchased the Pegg building on 4th Avenue.
A cheese factory was established here by Hetland Produce.
A WPA Recreation Department crew worked on a Chautauqua Park playground.
Over 3,000 animals were entered in the 1938 Winter Show. Sales totaled over $5,000, with the top bull selling for $175.
Tomato growing on a big scale in the Sheyenne Valley was proposed.
The creamery produced 14,000 pounds of ice cream mix in five months.
Schmitz Hardware, Hruby Cleaners and Lee’s Market expanded their quarters.
Officials toured the site proposed for Baldhil Dam.
L. A. W. Stephan, Sanborn joined William Pearce in city law firm.
Six hundred Eagles marched in a Labor Day parade.
Earl Pegg purchased Bienn Chevrolet.
Bunyan Day was a feature of a Corn-lamb show.
Ken Coghlan opened the Coast To Coast Store.
A crew of 125 began work on the National Fish Hatchery.
Grasshopper poison was distributed.
Carol Wemett was welcomed as a Hollywood Movie Queen when the Kiwanis club sponsored a play. Later, the “queen was “abducted” and taken to Nome.
K. P. clubrooms opened in the city.
A grant of $25,000 was received to complete the auditorium basement.
National Tea Company opened a store on Main Street.
W. T. Craswell retired after 22 years as city auditor, was succeeded by L. T. Halvorson.
Sherman Clothiers was started by Paul P. Sherman.

1934

1934
A record 2, 275 votes were cast in Valley City in the primary election. In November polling, Barnes County had an 8,208 total.
A new 75 x 75 foot, two story Barnes County Implement building was planned.
Norwest Airlines resumed passenger service to the city.
The 1933-1934 winter was the mildest on record.
A CCC camp was established near the city baseball park with 200 men coming to work on area projects.
April dust storms hit the city, making it difficult to see across streets.
Fred Fredrickson was nominated by the GOP for lieutenant governor.
Drought and grasshoppers hit crops severely before rain came early in June.
One thousand marched in the city Child Welfare Week parade.
There were 10,000 at Catholic Day observance in Chautauqua Park.
A crowd of 2500 attended the fist county eighth grade graduation in Chautauqua Park.
Grafton nipped Svea, 25-22, for the N. D. Class B Title at the tournament in Valley City.
Then carloads of cattle were shipped from Valley city and area in a drought relief project.
Oakes registered 111 degrees.
It was believed 75 percent of the state’s hay crop was destroyed by heat and drought.
A FERA canning plant in the city turned out 36,000 cans of tomatoes and beef. There were 25 women and four men employed.
Chapnell Sheet Metal Works opened in the city.
The N. C. League of Municipalities reelected Fred Fredrickson as president.
George Dixon, Valley City, was chairman of a city Better Housing Campaign.
A mattress manufacturing plant was approved for Valley City.
S & L grocery moved to a new addition constructed by the company.
E. C. Hilborn wrote of shelterbelts to be planted across the central United States.
Organization of an Eagles’ Aerie began.
The city was number one in North Dakota in fire prevention. 1933 losses were only $248.
Sunday movies in North Dakota were approved by voters. An addition of $13,500 to the city school district levy was approved in a special election.
A Halloween celebration was stated in the baseball park.
The city’s $75,000 sewage treatment plant was completed and began operations.
Thousands came for the city July 4 celebration. There were 2,000 at baseball games.
An airmail route included the city.

1937

1937
B. E Groom of GNDA advocated a Valley City Winter Fair.
Herman Stern was elected GNDA president.
Designed by Paul Barnes, the 3rd Avenue Bridge was opened.
Olga Olufson and Albert Berg were wed in a public wedding, a feature of the city’s Fall Festival.
1937 conventions and state meetings in the city included the State Bar meeting: Railway Employees, with special trains bringing 700; first N.D. Eagles convention with 1,000 attending.
Wheat yielded six to 10 bushels to the acre; early summer heat and drought had caused damage. Late in the season, the heaviest rain for years, 2. 63 inches, was measured. Valley City was to be the concentration point for planting 600 miles of shelter belt trees. Dr. James E. Cox was named STC president when Dr. Weltzin, while on leave of absence resigned.
MDU announced construction of a $19,000 plant in the city.
An area farmer planted sunflowers for windbreak, snow traps and feed for birds, increased grain crop because of additional moisture.
Mike McCarthy, civic and Commerce secretary bought the Arcade. Mark J. Connolly was his successor.
The Rev. T. E. Nugent resigned as Times Record editor. Phil Mark was named editor.
A foot of snow in February halted traffic.
VCHS won 13-12, over Grand Forks in the state basketball tournament, lost to Minot, 25-23.
N. W. Bell expended $38,000 for a new building and equipment in the city.
Thomas Moodie, N. D. PWA director, gave the address when the new armory was dedicated.
City merchants gave away 10,000 chicks during an April Market Day.
Frank Helmsworth purchased the City Market from G. J. Christianson.
The Straus firm marked its 55th anniversary. Herman Stern had been manager for 35 years.
Lieberman’s Ladies Wear store was remodeled.
The Opera House block was sold to Milton Holiday by D. W. Clark.
Foss Drug became a Walgreen Agency.
William Stark and Barney Doiring opened The Produce House.
A new $129, 572 turbine was installed by Municipal Utilities.
Fairmont purchased the R. E. cob Creamery.
Twenty five new cars were shown in the mammoth new armory.
A Poultry show brought 500 entries.
Les Webster purchased the sheet metal business from C. C. Chappell. The business was located where KOVC was at one time.1937
B. E Groom of GNDA advocated a Valley City Winter Fair.
Herman Stern was elected GNDA president.
Designed by Paul Barnes, the 3rd Avenue Bridge was opened.
Olga Olufson and Albert Berg were wed in a public wedding, a feature of the city’s Fall Festival.
1937 conventions and state meetings in the city included the State Bar meeting: Railway Employees, with special trains bringing 700; first N.D. Eagles convention with 1,000 attending.
Wheat yielded six to 10 bushels to the acre; early summer heat and drought had caused damage. Late in the season, the heaviest rain for years, 2. 63 inches, was measured. Valley City was to be the concentration point for planting 600 miles of shelter belt trees. Dr. James E. Cox was named STC president when Dr. Weltzin, while on leave of absence resigned.
MDU announced construction of a $19,000 plant in the city.
An area farmer planted sunflowers for windbreak, snow traps and feed for birds, increased grain crop because of additional moisture.
Mike McCarthy, civic and Commerce secretary bought the Arcade. Mark J. Connolly was his successor.
The Rev. T. E. Nugent resigned as Times Record editor. Phil Mark was named editor.
A foot of snow in February halted traffic.
VCHS won 13-12, over Grand Forks in the state basketball tournament, lost to Minot, 25-23.
N. W. Bell expended $38,000 for a new building and equipment in the city.
Thomas Moodie, N. D. PWA director, gave the address when the new armory was dedicated.
City merchants gave away 10,000 chicks during an April Market Day.
Frank Helmsworth purchased the City Market from G. J. Christianson.
The Straus firm marked its 55th anniversary. Herman Stern had been manager for 35 years.
Lieberman’s Ladies Wear store was remodeled.
The Opera House block was sold to Milton Holiday by D. W. Clark.
Foss Drug became a Walgreen Agency.
William Stark and Barney Doiring opened The Produce House.
A new $129, 572 turbine was installed by Municipal Utilities.
Fairmont purchased the R. E. cob Creamery.
Twenty five new cars were shown in the mammoth new armory.
A Poultry show brought 500 entries.
Les Webster purchased the sheet metal business from C. C. Chappell. The business was located where KOVC was at one time.