1944
Jaycees painted parking stripes on streets.
Dr. F. L. Wicks headed North Dakota’s medical group.
City officials outline a $3,000,000 plan for post war projects at a meeting in Fargo. Projects included a swimming pool, airport expansion, Winter Show and sports buildings, water main extensions, change in steam heating, a Sheyenne River bridge and support forBaldhill Dam.
A Navy V-12 unit band of STC marched in the Memorial Day parade.
The P & O Market moved from Main Street to quarters near the Fair Store.
In observance of the invasion of Europe, stores in the city closed for one hour for special prayers.
Mercy Hospital benefit fund drive was aided by communities throughout the area.
An extensive youth program to combat juvenile delinquency was underway in the city. Gary Jones directed efforts.
Stock was being sold to finance a proposed $250,000 Land O’Lakes expansion project here.
Roy Feltman, a rigger on the Hi-Line Bridge, fell 75 feet from a painting scaffold. His condition showed improvement at Mercy Hospital.
R. L. Brown purchased the Anderson Funeral Home.
County commissioners voted a half mill levy for the Winter Show fund.
Mayor Curtis Olson proclaimed a city holiday when the Germans surrendered. The proclamation was issued August 31, 1944.
City dealers had 1,000 boxes of shells to sell to an estimated 2,000 hunters.
Demobilization plans for the army were studied as victory in Europe seemed near.
Henning Olson, Grand Forks, established an upholstery shop here.
Times Record and Barnes County News were consolidated, purchased by Valle City businessmen, who in turn sold the publication to Don Matchan October 1.
4-H members could swing the vote for a Winter show building, said A. J. Dexter, N. P. Extension agent.
Pheasants were sent to city Elks in armed forces this country as Christmas gifts.
Land O’Lakes broke ground for its $250,000 processing plant here.
Authority to levy a one-quarter mill levy for the Winter Show was approved in the November election.
Fred Aandahl was elected governor of North Dakota.
Ben Grotte was appointed chairman of the area ware price and ration board.
A “gentleman bandit” robbed the Gamble- Robinson plant and stole a car in the city to make his getaway.
Hjalmar Holt was elected president of the N. D. Hotel Association.
Valley City mobilized a “third army” to put over the Sixth War Loan drive.
Mercy Hospital’s benefit drive reach $12,000.
Tome Calnan won national acclaim for extension work.
Baldhill Dam was approved in Congress with an appropriation of $810,000, Fred Fredrickson informed city officials.
Freeman Anderson purchased the McGillivray apartment House.
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Clark marked their 65th anniversary in the city.
William Krause purchased Anderson Furniture and Funeral Home.
King Ludwig’s Bavarian throne was on display in the armory during a War Bond campaign.
Breeders Association donated $500 toward construction of a Winter show livestock building.
“A” card gasoline ration value was cut from three to two gallons.
Curtis Olson was acting mayor. Fred Fredrickson resigned after 14 years.
William Pearce resumed law practice here after resigning as an assistant attorney general.
The County War Bond goal was $640,000.
Jaycees selected George Golz, chief engineer at Municipal Utilities, as outstanding young man.
Ken Coghlan added a furniture department to the Coast to Coast Store.
New cold storage lockers were to be installed at the Farms of the North Produce company on Front Street.
Every person was asked to pledge “clean your plate” to avoid waste of food.
Ken Coghlan was elected Civic Club president.
The Hoosier Hot Shots were booked for Winter Show.
Nearly $22,000 in dividends was paid to 329 patrons of Barnes County Co-op Creamery.
The city subscribed over $300,000 in its War Bond quota.
Robert Ingstad purchased Radio KOVC.
Curtis Olson was elected city mayor.
Wears opened a mail order store in the city.
Early buying of coal for the winter was urged.
OPA dropped some vegetables, including spinach from rationing.
The City attracted national attention by business. Increase. T. C. Hutchinson, Civic club secretary, said bank debits were 130 percent above those of a similar quarter in 1942.
W. J. McGibbon purchased the Kindred Hotel from F. W. Hart.1944
Jaycees painted parking stripes on streets.
Dr. F. L. Wicks headed North Dakota’s medical group.
City officials outline a $3,000,000 plan for post war projects at a meeting in Fargo. Projects included a swimming pool, airport expansion, Winter Show and sports buildings, water main extensions, change in steam heating, a Sheyenne River bridge and support forBaldhill Dam.
A Navy V-12 unit band of STC marched in the Memorial Day parade.
The P & O Market moved from Main Street to quarters near the Fair Store.
In observance of the invasion of Europe, stores in the city closed for one hour for special prayers.
Mercy Hospital benefit fund drive was aided by communities throughout the area.
An extensive youth program to combat juvenile delinquency was underway in the city. Gary Jones directed efforts.
Stock was being sold to finance a proposed $250,000 Land O’Lakes expansion project here.
Roy Feltman, a rigger on the Hi-Line Bridge, fell 75 feet from a painting scaffold. His condition showed improvement at Mercy Hospital.
R. L. Brown purchased the Anderson Funeral Home.
County commissioners voted a half mill levy for the Winter Show fund.
Mayor Curtis Olson proclaimed a city holiday when the Germans surrendered. The proclamation was issued August 31, 1944.
City dealers had 1,000 boxes of shells to sell to an estimated 2,000 hunters.
Demobilization plans for the army were studied as victory in Europe seemed near.
Henning Olson, Grand Forks, established an upholstery shop here.
Times Record and Barnes County News were consolidated, purchased by Valle City businessmen, who in turn sold the publication to Don Matchan October 1.
4-H members could swing the vote for a Winter show building, said A. J. Dexter, N. P. Extension agent.
Pheasants were sent to city Elks in armed forces this country as Christmas gifts.
Land O’Lakes broke ground for its $250,000 processing plant here.
Authority to levy a one-quarter mill levy for the Winter Show was approved in the November election.
Fred Aandahl was elected governor of North Dakota.
Ben Grotte was appointed chairman of the area ware price and ration board.
A “gentleman bandit” robbed the Gamble- Robinson plant and stole a car in the city to make his getaway.
Hjalmar Holt was elected president of the N. D. Hotel Association.
Valley City mobilized a “third army” to put over the Sixth War Loan drive.
Mercy Hospital’s benefit drive reach $12,000.
Tome Calnan won national acclaim for extension work.
Baldhill Dam was approved in Congress with an appropriation of $810,000, Fred Fredrickson informed city officials.
Freeman Anderson purchased the McGillivray apartment House.
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Clark marked their 65th anniversary in the city.
William Krause purchased Anderson Furniture and Funeral Home.
King Ludwig’s Bavarian throne was on display in the armory during a War Bond campaign.
Breeders Association donated $500 toward construction of a Winter show livestock building.
“A” card gasoline ration value was cut from three to two gallons.
Curtis Olson was acting mayor. Fred Fredrickson resigned after 14 years.
William Pearce resumed law practice here after resigning as an assistant attorney general.
The County War Bond goal was $640,000.
Jaycees selected George Golz, chief engineer at Municipal Utilities, as outstanding young man.
Ken Coghlan added a furniture department to the Coast to Coast Store.
New cold storage lockers were to be installed at the Farms of the North Produce company on Front Street.
Every person was asked to pledge “clean your plate” to avoid waste of food.
Ken Coghlan was elected Civic Club president.
The Hoosier Hot Shots were booked for Winter Show.
Nearly $22,000 in dividends was paid to 329 patrons of Barnes County Co-op Creamery.
The city subscribed over $300,000 in its War Bond quota.
Robert Ingstad purchased Radio KOVC.
Curtis Olson was elected city mayor.
Wears opened a mail order store in the city.
Early buying of coal for the winter was urged.
OPA dropped some vegetables, including spinach from rationing.
The City attracted national attention by business. Increase. T. C. Hutchinson, Civic club secretary, said bank debits were 130 percent above those of a similar quarter in 1942.
W. J. McGibbon purchased the Kindred Hotel from F. W. Hart.

Advertisements