Posts from the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Welcome Home Peggy Lee Parade 1950

Welcome Home Peggy Lee

Carl Frederick Zaun

Carl Frederick Zaun, the third youngest child of Fred and Emelie Zaun, was born on September 8, 1892. He married Alma Bartz on November 5, 1913. Alma was born August 10, 1895, in Alta Township, the daughter of Fred and Bertha Bartz.

Carl and Alma farmed on his father’s farm fire miles northwest of Valley City until Carl died on July 20, 1918.

Carl and Alma were blessed with three children; Lawrence of New Hope, Minnesota, Gladys Kopp (Mrs. Henry Holkman) of Edina, Minnesota; and Helen (Mrs. Hubert Podenski) of Jamestown, North Dakota. Alma was married again in 1920 to Frank Hilborn. They lived in various areas of North Dakota and Minnesota. After divorcing Frank, she lived in Jamestown, North Dakota for several years, and in 1945, she moved back to Valley City, where she has lived ever since.

Alma and Frank were blessed with eight children:

  1. Vivian (Mrs. Paul Thomas) of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
  2. Lloyd of Burnsville, Minnesota;
  3. Lola (Mrs. Harry Goulding) of Woodridge, Illinois;
  4. Virgil of Fargo, North Dakota;
  5. Beverly (Mrs. Donald Peterson) of Missoula, Montana;
  6. Frank of Belcourt, Wisconsin;
  7. Russell of Valley City. Another son,
  8. Ray Gordon, was killed at the age of 1½ years.

Frank Zaun

Frank Zaun was born to Mr. and Mrs. Carl Zaun on July 2, 1904. He was born on the home farm south of Valley City and has continued to make his home there.

On June 26, 1930, he was married to Clara Huber, and they took over the farm from Frank’s father. Frank and Clara had five children: Gerald, of Fargo, North Dakota, is Supervising Engineer at Northwestern Bell; Ted, who farms south of the home farm; Mary Ann Armbrust of  Krisann Estates of Fargo, who is teaching dome Economics and Special Education in the South High School; Denis, who is Purchasing Manager at Western Gear Manufacturing Company in Jamestown, North Dakota, and Richard, who is manager of Morton Building Company in Valley City. There are nineteen grandchildren.

Frank and Clara still actively farm on the home farm with the help of Ted and his sons, Michael and Kevin.

Frank Zaun served on the Township, board of Marsh Township for about forty years.

Source: Barnes County History 1976 Page 280

1931 Valley City

1931

Rev. Ployhar took over as county attorney; J. B. Shearer, register of deeds, Arthur Sunde, sheriff: and Ted Hedstrum, deputy sheriff.

Harold Gulbrandson, Kenmare joined The Fair Store, as assistant manager.

Dr. E. B. Crosby and Dr. S. Z. Zimmerman purchased the Valley City clinic building across from the Rudolf.

Howard Wilson of Leal was named chairman of the Barnes County Commissioner.

Attorney H. A. Olsberg was named county judge to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Judge Irgens.

W. W. Fritch and Carl bonde bough the Right Price Store and were to remodel the premises vacant after a disastrous fire.

Clarence Carlson was elected commander of the American Legion.

Cream was received at the new Barnes county cooperative Creamery.

William Posthumas was manager.

Astrid Fjelde, Valley City, was appearing as a member of the Tollefson Trio, singing Scandinavian songs.

The Cobb Company purchased the potato warehouse property on Front Street and established a creamery, poultry, and egg packing plant there. C. M. Hetland was district manager.

John W. Blume was appointed an alderman.

Anthony Fiola closed his fruit and vegetable store on Sixth Avenue to become manager of the Cities Service Station on Sixth Avenue and Front Street.

The world’s first reaper, invented by Cyrus McCormick in 1831 was on exhibit at the Valley City International Company.

John O. Hanchett and L. T. Sprout became partners in a law office.

M. P. Korgh and Paul Sherman opened a clothing store on Main Street.

Ron Holm was transferred from the Montgomery Ward store her to Watertown.

Dr. Glenn Hullet was elected president of the Chautauqua Association.

Irl Carr sold half his interests in the billiard hall to Mike McCarthy, Tower City.

J. H. Sampson opened his new café in the Barnes County Implement Company building.

William Craswell was elected fire chief for the 21st time.

Ben Northridge, Frank Bailey, Clarence Carlson, were elected aldermen.

Edward Norgaard opened Ed’s Fixit Shop under the Middlewest Bank Building.

 

 

 

Judge Alphonso Barnes

Judge Alphonso (Alanson) Barnes-“The Record”, page 2, Vol.1, No. l May 1895
Born Lewis County, N.Y.1817. Red law at office of David Bennett and admitted to bar at 23 Practiced in N.Y. until 1854 when he moved to Delevan, Wis. Appointed “Draft Commissioner” by Lincoln and filled levees for Civil War. Appointed associate Chief Justice of Dakota Territory by President Grant April 1873 with headquarters in Yankton, 2nd Judicial District. After and as a result of a dispute over the railroad and bond situation maneuvering by Gov. Burbank, he was re-assigned to the 3rd. Judicial District with headquarters in Pembina by Whitney, Territorial Secretary in the absence of Burbank. His letters and personal appearance in Washington against the administration of Burbank caused Burbank’s resignation. He was reappointed Associate Justice by President Hayes in 1877 and was succeeded by Judge Hudson in l88l. Was a delegate to the Fargo convention for Division in 1882. After the Burbank episode, the Territorial Legislature re-named Burbank County on July 14, 1874 to Barnes County In his honor Burbank had named the county after his name when created on January 4, 1873.

Barnes County “The Record” page 29, Vol.1, No. l May 1895
County Named after Judge Alphonso (Alanson) Barnes, Associate Justice of Dakota Territory by Territorial Legislature on July 14, 1874
County first named Burbank after the then Governor of Dakota Territory, John A. Burbank, a political appointee of President Grant. Burbank, maneuvering to make a fortune thru railroad promotion and the sale of land and bonds, threatened Judge Barnes with banishment to Pembina if he did not rule on the legality of his actions. Barnes refused and sent information to Washington regarding Burbank’s schemes. The Territorial surveyor corroborated his reports and Burbank was forced to resign. Barnes in the mean time had been banished to the 3rd. Judicial District at Pembina by Burbank’s henchman, the Territorial Secretary, Whitney, while Burbank was in Washington to plead his case. Territorial Legislature then re-named Burbank County to Barnes County in his honor, after Burbank had resigned.

History of the Sheyenne Valley

History of Sheyenne Valley

From time immemorial, the human race has been moving about.  An intuitive trait in the human make up seems to urge it out of the old habitations to see new places where homes could be built and where new enterprises could be engaged in.  This restive trait is without any doubt one of the great causes for the fact that the human race has found its way to all livable places on the globe.  A thinning out as it were of the over- crowded places to fill in those which were more sparsely populated.

It is rather sad indeed, to tear loose from the old native country the old home, from kindred and acquaintances and go to a country which is unknown, a country with strange people, different customs and different language, but necessity made it imperative.  Go, struggle, and win — or stay, struggle and get nowhere.  Facing these two alternatives, the thousands of struggling European people, followed the beck and call of the new world and came to the land of the free, not always as fortune hunters but rather, to find a place where they were enabled to build a home of their own, a thing that was impossible in their native country, owing to circumstances over which they had no control.

Thus America was settled by the so called useless surplus of the old world.  But which has proved to be the right and only kind of people that could be used, in the building of the greatest republic under the sun.

As it was with America in a large measure, so it has evidently been with her states in a smaller scale.  “Go West, young man, go West!” was the bugle call sounded in the East, and west they came, by the thousands.  A cordial invitation was accorded them from the limitless prairies, with a virgin soil unparallel in fertility.  Thus North Dakota was settled by immigrants from the older settlements in the east and people coming directly from Northern Europe.

We stated that a cordial welcome was accorded the pioneers and it is true to the fullest extent of the term, but it was a welcome not to a life of leisure and idleness but a welcome to hard strenuous labor, all kinds of sacrifices, and privations—and not the least among them, the lonely feelings so excellently expressed by Bojer in his book “Vor Egen Stamme”, “It was the prairie, the sun and Him”  That was all, “But there were Giants in the Earth in those days” tall men, sun crowned men, men with an indomitable will behind a steely arm.  Men that had a vision, men with faith in the unseen.  They visualized the prairies yielding bountiful crops, even before a kernel was sown.  They were to it and realized their dream.

Before we proceed with the history of the old pioneers we bed permission to devote a few lines of this historical sketch to a very important incident in the history of our state.  An event immediately preceding the early settlement of this community.  An even lending tint, as it were, of a very important and interesting character to this particular part of our state.

In the month of June, in 1863, General Sibley, began his march through the Minnesota Valley against the Indians who were encamped at Devils Lake.  He came from Abercrombie up to Big Bend on the Sheyenne River by what  now is Lisbon, or close to that place.  In his army was a captain by the very significant name of Ole Paulson.  Later this man became a pastor in the Lutheran Free Church.  A few years before his death he wrote his autobiography and in this he gives a very graphic description of the march across what later became Fort Ransom.  Over yonder on Mr. E. Storhoff’s place there has been found an unmistakable evidence of a camping place, dating to Sibley’s March in 1863.  Therefore the Historical society of the state placed a maker at said place some time ago.  The army continued marching north to what then was called Fort Atchinson, fifteen miles northwest  of what is now called Cooperstown, then west to the Missouri river where they were suppose to meet General Sully coming up the river from Yankton, South Dakota as per previous agreement.  He failed to come however, owing to the fact that the water in the river was too low for navigation.  In 1864, Sibley began his return March over the same route, crossing fort Ransom, Lisbon, Big Bend, and Abercrombie.    From Abercrombie Captain Paulson was ordered to cross the flat over to Pelican Lake in Minnesota, and in the early part of November, 1864, this company voted unaminously for Abraham Lincoln.  This election took place on the shore of Pelican Lake.

History of the Sheyenne Valley

History of Sheyenne Valley

From time immemorial, the human race has been moving about.  An intuitive trait in the human make up seems to urge it out of the old habitations to see new places where homes could be built and where new enterprises could be engaged in.  This restive trait is without any doubt one of the great causes for the fact that the human race has found its way to all livable places on the globe.  A thinning out as it were of the over- crowded places to fill in those which were more sparsely populated.

It is rather sad indeed, to tear loose from the old native country the old home, from kindred and acquaintances and go to a country which is unknown, a country with strange people, different customs and different language, but necessity made it imperative.  Go, struggle, and win — or stay, struggle and get nowhere.  Facing these two alternatives, the thousands of struggling European people, followed the beck and call of the new world and came to the land of the free, not always as fortune hunters but rather, to find a place where they were enabled to build a home of their own, a thing that was impossible in their native country, owing to circumstances over which they had no control.

Thus America was settled by the so called useless surplus of the old world.  But which has proved to be the right and only kind of people that could be used, in the building of the greatest republic under the sun.

As it was with America in a large measure, so it has evidently been with her states in a smaller scale.  “Go West, young man, go West!” was the bugle call sounded in the East, and west they came, by the thousands.  A cordial invitation was accorded them from the limitless prairies, with a virgin soil unparallel in fertility.  Thus North Dakota was settled by immigrants from the older settlements in the east and people coming directly from Northern Europe.

We stated that a cordial welcome was accorded the pioneers and it is true to the fullest extent of the term, but it was a welcome not to a life of leisure and idleness but a welcome to hard strenuous labor, all kinds of sacrifices, and privations—and not the least among them, the lonely feelings so excellently expressed by Bojer in his book “Vor Egen Stamme”, “It was the prairie, the sun and Him”  That was all, “But there were Giants in the Earth in those days” tall men, sun crowned men, men with an indomitable will behind a steely arm.  Men that had a vision, men with faith in the unseen.  They visualized the prairies yielding bountiful crops, even before a kernel was sown.  They were to it and realized their dream.

Before we proceed with the history of the old pioneers we bed permission to devote a few lines of this historical sketch to a very important incident in the history of our state.  An event immediately preceding the early settlement of this community.  An even lending tint, as it were, of a very important and interesting character to this particular part of our state.

In the month of June, in 1863, General Sibley, began his march through the Minnesota Valley against the Indians who were encamped at Devils Lake.  He came from Abercrombie up to Big Bend on the Sheyenne River by what  now is Lisbon, or close to that place.  In his army was a captain by the very significant name of Ole Paulson.  Later this man became a pastor in the Lutheran Free Church.  A few years before his death he wrote his autobiography and in this he gives a very graphic description of the march across what later became Fort Ransom.  Over yonder on Mr. E. Storhoff’s place there has been found an unmistakable evidence of a camping place, dating to Sibley’s March in 1863.  Therefore the Historical society of the state placed a maker at said place some time ago.  The army continued marching north to what then was called Fort Atchinson, fifteen miles northwest  of what is now called Cooperstown, then west to the Missouri river where they were suppose to meet General Sully coming up the river from Yankton, South Dakota as per previous agreement.  He failed to come however, owing to the fact that the water in the river was too low for navigation.  In 1864, Sibley began his return March over the same route, crossing fort Ransom, Lisbon, Big Bend, and Abercrombie.    From Abercrombie Captain Paulson was ordered to cross the flat over to Pelican Lake in Minnesota, and in the early part of November, 1864, this company voted unaminously for Abraham Lincoln.  This election took place on the shore of Pelican Lake.