Posts from the ‘Year Highlight’ Category

1949

1949
Melvin Olson opened his new Hi-liner Café and ice cream store at 826 Main Street.
Protests against what they considered inadequate storm sewers were made to the city council by property owners.
Larry Bonaventura was the new owner of the Piller Theater.
The Valle City Assembly of God at Eighth and Conkling was dedicated.
The new swimming pool opened. M. H. Strandberg was general manager. A hot sun beamed down as the pool opened.
Robert Montgomery and Bette Davis starred in “June Bride” when the modernized Piller Theater opened.
More than 100 blocks of sewer mains were cleaned in the city after serious damage by heavy rains.
Prizes totaling nearly $400 were given at the city Lions Club Flower Show.
Earl Olsberg and Tom Nix were route planners and lead the Sheyenne Riding Club on a wood and hills tour.
T. S. Henry sold his Barnes County Abstract and Henry and Henry Insurance Agency to Roy Gillund and A. F. Fir, formerly bankers in Nome.
Dr. Cecil Ireland was elected president of the Central District, ND Dental Association.
Steven’s Shoe Store opened.
Land O’Lakes opened in a new building on Front Street after Rolly Gessner and his crew brought in heavy equipment.
Dr. Paul Reslock, Devils Lake, opened an optometry practice in the city.
A 30 bed addition to Mercy Hospital was constructed.
Sixty business and professional men became members of the Sheyenne Valley Rodeo Association.
J. M. Leegard and Jake Smith were chairmen of a campaign to complete raising funds for construction of the Sheyenne Hospital.
New street markers were being installed throughout the city.
Lloyd Triebold sold his California Fruit Store to Frank Beal and bought the Silver Dollar from G. J. Christianson.
Mrs. Helen Anderson purchased the What-Not-Shop from Anna G. and May Baillie. She was former owner of Mac’ Band Box.
Culligan soft Water Service in the city was sold to William Lorenz by Roger Hovde.
Nearly 1,000 teachers attended the district NDEA meeting here.
Andrew Fritch harvested 250 bags of onions from a third of an acre near the city.
Fred King was given a 50 year service badge by the city fire department.
The Lutheran Home for the Aged held an open house to show need of expansion. The home was filled to capacity with 50 occupants.
There were 58 undefeated and untied football teams in the nation October 21. One of the teams was STC.
Howard Langemo was Joseph and Melvin Olson played Pharoah in a Biblical play sponsored by the Kiwanis club.
The First Lutheran church observed it 70th Anniversary.
Registered Chester Whites were auctioned at the Winter Show building, with 18 breeders consigning animals.
Roy Ployhar was elected Dinner Club president.
The Bison Freight Line opened a new terminal building in Valley City.
Valley City’s high school band was in new uniforms, completely paid for by funds raised by band mothers.
There were 50 candidates for the VCHS basketball varsity.
Ida Bisek Prokop Lee completed the clay model of Chief Drags Wolf, last of the Hidatsa tribe of western North Dakota.
Grand opening of the $300,000 Foss Drug and Medical Center took place December 3.
Mrs. Dale Thorson reopened the Rudolf Beauty Shop.
First unit of the Sheyenne Memorial hospital would be constructed in the spring of 1950, said Carl V. Olson, board president. More than $100,000 had been raised for the hospital.
The newly formed Choral Club of 40 voices gave a Christmas Concert.
“Moon” Mullins, former Notre Dame star, spoke at the Viking Recognition banquet.
Lester DeKrey joined the Soil Conservation District
Here
. Herman Osen, Carpenter Lumber Co. manager,
invited people to tour the new home built to sell for
$6,000.
Mr. and Mrs. D.W. Clark observed their 70th
wedding anniversary.
A suggestion to last-minute
shoppers was to buy a Service Record Book of World
Wars I and II.
The street department got a “bouquet” for work in
street clearing after a January storm.
William Arthur
Lydell of VCSC was chosen to be a guest of the New
York Symphony on a broadcast Jan. 16 from New
York.
Mrs. R.O. Miller received an order from Puerto
Rico for the Miller bread slicer.
Valley City led the state by a wide percentage in
building permit increase. The gain over the previous
year was 236 percent. Reserve Bank figures also
showed the city as leading all other cities in the district
in department store sales gains in December. The T-R
had set a new record in advertising lineage the same
month.
A fast-dwindling supply of coal*”for the municipal
plant was being conserved as lignite mining areas
were blocked by snow. With four carloads of coal
arriving, the supply was enough for 10 days.
The
Assembly of God congregation bought a church at
Engievale and moved it here.
William Baribeau,
Rolette, was transferred here to assist the soil conservation
district.
Gorman King celebrated the first anniversary of his
seed plant located on Front Street.
The Fifth Army’s
Disaster Force “Snowbound” was mobilizing in 12
North Dakota counties.
Milton Myhre, 12, was the new
“assistant” to A.M. Paulson, Winter Show secretary,
putting in a full day at the job. J.P. Smith was elected
president of the N.D. Retail Lumberman’s Association.

All booth space in the armory was rented for the
Winter Show.
Major improvements were completed in the David
George Hotel, formerly Manoles Motel.
Valley Hotel on
Main Street completed a renovation project. Miss
BeBe Shopp, Miss America, called Valley City
“adorable” when she appeared at the Winter Show.
More than 3,000 attended the “American Beauty
Revue.”
Almost 3,000 meals were served during the Winter
Show banquet.
Lucille Clancy was elected president of
the N.D. 4-H Institute.
Valley City barbers announced a drop in haircut prices from $1 to 75 cents.
The city council voted $4,500 towards installation of lights at the city baseball park.
The One in One Hundred Club was formed to get additional funds.
LaRae Robertson was N. D. DeMolay queen.
Green Valley Laundry was opened by Ben Torguson.
Arthur F. Nelson, Livingston, Mont., leased the
Davidson Machine Shop.
Being an artist on the prairie
was described as an adventure by Ida Bisek Prokop.

Five major projects were the swimming pool, a new
theater, Co-op creamery, the enlarged Land O7 Lakes
plant and Green Valley Laundry. Hruby Cleaners,
Olson Motor Co., Peter Oil Station, Koehler Building,
Clock Lounge, Duffy Garage and a drive-in ice cream
shop were other new or remodeled projects.

The Valley City-Langdon bus line was reopened.
A
memorial erected in memory of Msgr. John Baker was
dedicated.
Installation of lights for the night baseball
system began. William Fagerstrom opened a new
building for his blacksmith and welding shop!

Bruce Grotberg opened a cabinet shop in the Kindred
Hotel.
An 1849 covered wagon was on display as an
additional feature of the first baseball game under
lights here. The lighting system, not fully completed,
failed in the second inning.
Paul Bjornson had 60
horses at his riding academy.

Advertisements

1948

1948
Company G’s manpower was cut to 65 and enlistment were banned. Original strength was 180 and about 110 men were in the unit.
Albert Bartz, high school instructor, resigned to take over as director of a proposed Boys Ranch in Cass County.
Dr. Paul Cook shot a 29, seven under par, at the country club here.
The Dakota Press was purchased by the Times Record.
Christ Jantzen’s Courts, with four cabins opened on Third Street West.
A huge Indian burial ground was discovered in an area slated to be flooded by Baldhill reservoir.
James Eckel, one of the city’s all-time athletic greats, became VCHS coach.
A record crowd, estimated at 6, 000 came for the annual Farmers and Merchants Picnic.
Contracts were let for an addition to the District Highway Shop.
Jake Smith purchased Grotte Lumber Company buildings.
Miss Valborg Skorpen, R. N. was elected president of the N. D. State Board of Nursing.
T. S. Henry, who had served at Manila, was elected president of the First N D. Volunteer Infantry at the outfits’s 50th reunion.
Phil Harris and Frank Remley of radio fame visited in the city.
The Pullman, Valley City, entered service on a N. P. transcontinental run.
The municipal light plant broke all records for August power generation. Sold were 1,439, 066 kilowatt hours.
Steps to reorganize the American Legion Drum and bugle Corps began in September.
A rodent control program was put into effect in the city.
The Lee Bowling Alleys, flooded by the Sheyenne, were put back ito condition.
Bus line service between Valley City and Langdon was authorized.
Ground was broken for a new bus depot on Third Avenue and Third Street.
First service in the new church building was held by Our Savior’s Lutheran congregation.
Approved was $200,000 for a new library at STC.
A bus line between Valley city and Bottineau began operations.
STC enrollment was 465, up 52.
Hiring of an architect to draw blueprints for the proposed Sheyenne Hospital was approved.
Blacktopping of new No. 10 through the city was completed.
A Barnes county Soil Conservation District was organized in the city.
Dr. Phog Allen, nationally famous basketball coach, spoke at the STC clinic.
Edgar Miller opened a jewelry store in the city.
Herman Stern was elected president of the Red River Valley Boy Scout Council.
Seven celebrity speakers were booked for the dinner Club, a new city organization.
New shrine clubrooms in the Fidelity savings and Loan basement were formally opened.
A.M. Paulson, Bismarck, was appointed secretary of the city Civic and Commerce Association. He had served in the job for some years before moving to Fargo for an OPA position.
The city’s new “Basketball Bowl” was formerly opened with Mayor Curtis Olson shooting the first basket.
Coach Willis Osmon had planned and supervised the building of the new physical education building built on the former college Farm west of the Sheyenne River.
There were 25 veterans enrolled and a waiting list of 70 for the Farm Training Program in the city.
Spenningsby Brothers moved Northern supply Store to a new location.
Kohler Oil company opened a new building.
Olson Motor Company opened in new quarters on Highway 10.
There were 2,500 telephones in service in the city, said I. H. Anderson, NW manager.
Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Clark marked their 69th anniversary.
Valley City earned a berth in the national American Legion basketball tournament at Jeffersonville, Ind. In April by defeating Jamestown. Wally Graalum scored 11 points for the winners.
Bids wer opned for 74 modern light standards and equipment for the new whiteway system along the new highway to the city.
Major Woodrow Gagnon was elected president of a Reserve Officers unit.
Foss Drug observed it 25th anniversary in April and the owners announced plans for construction of an addition.
Valley city was fighting the worst flood since 1882.
Purchase of folding bleachers for the city auditorium and installation of White Way on the new highway no. 10 through the city were authorized.
Mercy Hospital participated in National Hospital Week noting that 5, 065 patients had been admitted in a year and that 546 babies had been born at the hospital in 12 months.
Contracts for $650,754 were awarded for the new Highway 10 through the city. Construction in Valley City and the county topping the $2 million total. Stage Two of Baldhill Dam was ot cost over $1 million. Highway No. 10 relocation in the city was the largest project here.
The Fair Store, continuing under the ownership of Karl J. Olsen, marked its 40th anniversary.
Plans were announced for paving about 40 blocks in the city.
Mrs. Alice D. Walker became acting postmaster in the city, July 1, succeeding Charles K. Otto.
About $1,000 was netted at a free public auction sponsored by the Civic Club at the Winter show grounds. A Model T went for $43.00.
January 1 marked the 55th anniversary of organizing of Wesley Methodist Church, formerly the Norwegian Danish Methodist Church. The Rev. Wilson Johnstone was pastor.
The Rev Thomas Nugent began his 25th year as city pastor.
Gordon K. Gray, Wilton, purchased Enterprise Seed Co.
Rudy Kent, of Kent’s Studio, opened what he termed the “First complete Kodak finishing plant in the city.”
Plans for reorganization of the School of Nursing connected with Mercy Hospital were completed.
Earl Kruschwitz was supervisor of city League and Church League basketball.
Larry Iverson came from McIntosh County to succeed R. B. Widdifield, who had resigned as Barnes County Agent.
R. J. McHattie was acting master at the City Scales after death of Arthur Ratzlaff.
Dr. E. B. Crosby, Oriska, joined the Valley City Clinic.
Lee’s Market on Main Street marked its 50th anniversary of operation February 19.
Phil Jarvis and Frank Boughton purchased the Howard Gould building on Front Street to enlarge their blacksmith shop.
Toastmasters International organized a chapter in the city, with Frank Leussen as toastmaster.
Miller Brothers were called upon daily for air transportation service as highways were blocked by snow.
Leegard Auto and Oil company added the Diamond T truck agency.
Clinton Anderson, U. S. Secretary of Agriculture, and formerly president of Rotary International, spoke at a Rotary meeting here.
A record price of $4,000 was paid for the first Hereford bull offered at the Winter Show auction.
Mrs. Lucille Pomeroy Moe became the Times Record society editor.
Valley City’s VFW post was making arrangements to have a pictorial history of Barnes County war veterans published.
Dr. J. W. Gilsdorf, formerly of New England, opened a medical practice in Valley City.

1947

1947
A second taxicab company opened in Valley City, with Charles Hill and Sam Thompson as owners. Three cabs were on 24 hour call.
John Beck purchased the George Karshner Insurance Agency in the Middlewest building.
Thirty four new homes were built in the city as compared to only three such permits in 1945.
John Brandt, president of Land O’ Lakes, said the company was planning a $1,750,000 building program, included an all purpose plant in Valley City.
The city was allotted $40,000 in federal funds, to be match with $20,000 locally, to build an airport administration building.
Three hundred fifty new telephones have been installed in the city area, said I. H. Anderson, NW manager.
The Times Record did not publish January 4 because of the severe blizzard.
W. Atkinson, Devils Lake, representing Travelers’ insurance Company, moved to Valley City.
Carl Katz took over management of City Drug.
Pat Morgan sold his interests in Dakota Press to C. C. Morgan and F. R, Crowe.
The Kindred Hotel was being redecorated, with 48 rooms to be refinished.
C. V. Money resigned as STC athletic director.
Woodrow Gagnon, Fargo, purchased the Royal Café from J. O. Botten and Charlie Howard.
Lloyd Triebold took over management of the California Fruit Store, buying the business from Jake Chulse.
Clayton Thayer sold Spike’s Liquor Place to Wendlin Mattern and Joe Haman, Grand Forks, for a reported $26,000.
Rail and bus transportation came to a standstill in a blinding February 9 storm.
A vocational agriculture department was established at VCHS.
Charles Challey, LaMoure, was to head the department.
For the first time, the Arena and two other buildings were used for the Winter Show, although construction was not complete.
The Co-op Coffee Shop was opened by manager Harvey Aman at West Front.
Nearly 100 city businessmen were guests of GNDA when colored movies of the Garrison project were shown by bill Sebens.
Valley city purchased a new Seagraves fire engine for over $12,000.
Harlow Stillings was feted on the 25th anniversary of service as a rural mail carrier.
The Country Club received free trees from E. C. Hilborn’s nursery for planting along the fairways and tees.
NW Telephone company employees were on picket lines to show strike unity.
The AP called Valley City’s newspaper situation a journalistic crisis as friends of the editor-publisher called him liberal and enemies labeled him as radical.
Dr. Max Moore was nominated as governor of Rotary’s 117th district.
Appointment of Willis Osmon and C. H. Bliss to the STC athletic department was announced.
Andy Risem sold his photography studio to R. Kenneth McFarland.
Don Matchan turned down an offer to sell the Times Record to a group of businessmen.
Everything is “set to go” for baldhill Dam construction, said Mayor Curtis Olson.
The Red Owl Super Market was modernized. Wayne Drugan was manager.
The Snow White laundry was opened by Monroe Pottorff.
O. S. (Hub) Peterson was elected N. D. funeral Directors’ president.
U. S. engineers called for bids on stage one construction of Baldhill Dam.
Walter A. Jensen was elected president of the N. D. Frozen Locker Association.
Ulman Equipment Company was sold to Farmotors, Inc.
The Times Record was sold by don Matchan to Jerome Bjerke, Milton and James Wick and Owen Scott.
Violet Lutz opened the Gift Shoppe.
The first Lutheran congregation voted to build a new church on the present site.
Halloween pranksters tipped over the eight foot high fountain in City Park.
Valley City’s American Legion post purchased a 42 passenger school bus for use by the public.
An eight foot granite monument was dedicated on Armistice Day observance on city auditorium grounds. Inscribed were the name of the 80 Barnes County men who died in WW II.
Alden Anderson, owner of Dakota Auto Supply Company, purchased the Peterson Oil Company building on Second Street NW and Second Avenue. The company wholesaled to automotive dealers in the area.
John Halverson, oldest living former postmaster of Valley City, marked his 93rd birthday anniversary.
Dr. Lloyd C, Carlson opened practice of optometry in Middlewest Bank building.
A $250,000 bond issue to remodel the public school building was approved by voters by a 90 percent yes vote.
With installation of electric conveyors, the Bignall Lumber Company was ready to serve customers with a complete line of coal.
Spillway excavation and embankment work was near completion at Baldhill Dam.
Edward McGee, the city’s oldest resident, marked his 99th birthday anniversary.
The new library in the senior high school was dedicated as a memorial to Miss Thelma Torkelson.
At age 24, Walt Jensen was the youngest man to be elected president of the N. D. Frozen food Locker Association.
The council signed a contract with Olaf Wick to construct a 60 x 150 foot swimming pool for about $65,000.
Nearly 5,000 attended the Farmers Merchants Picnic sponsored here by city merchants.
Bernard C. Lyons opened a law office in the Middlewest Bank building.
C. L. Fennel, Minneapolis, purchased Frank’s Café from Frank Oulton.
Ground breaking ceremonies were held at the Baldhill Dam Site August 4. Machines that would carry up to 20 tons of earth each trip were brought to Baldhill as the $1,600,000 construction project got underway.
Billy Krause won the city croquet championship by defeating Karen Lydell. Krause also won the juvenile golf title. Bob King was second.
Mrs. Ruth Hamilton, Fargo, was named manager of Miller’s Ready To Wear store.
Memorial half-dollars, honoring Booker T. Washington, were on sale at the Times Record.
Helen Lorns, Valley City, became director of state examinations in the N. D. Department of Public Instruction.
The State Air Fair and Circus was held in the city August 27 and 5,000 visitors attended.
The Sheyenne Hospital Association dedicated the ground secured from Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Maier.
Frank Oulton purchased Percy Polyhar’s Dry Cleaning establishment.
Mrs. Clara Bechtle was elected president of N. D. County Auditors.
World War II veterans began cashing terminal leave bonds.
Snow White Laundry was sold to Oliver Esby and Edwin Johnson by Monroe Portorffs.
The reconditioned Valley Hotel Bowling Alleys opened.
“We are working hard to translate an ideal into a reality,” said Dr. H. L. Lokken, STC president, in dedicating the site where the proposed $300,000 Sheyenne Hospital is to be constructed.
Oliver Peterson purchased full interest in the Holberg-Peterson Funeral Home, renaming

1946

1946
The VFW Club opened in the Rudolf Hotel. Tyler Hoiland was commander.
Dan Smith returned to duties as state highway department engineer after 22 months in the Seabees.
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Mythaler presented a gift to the STC laboratory school to purchase books. It was given in memory of their son, David, killed in WW II.
Land O’Lakes announced it would expand its Valley City plant for egg, feed and poultry departments.
Jack Kerner, S & L manager was transferred to Fargo.
Sale of stock in the Grotte Lumber Company and leasing of the facilities to Jake P. Smith, Jamestown, was announced.
Fred Abrahamson opened a barber shop on Main Street.
Jaycees picked William Paulson as outstanding young man.
Lawrence Meldahl was elected Civic Club president.
Municipal Utilities showed a net profit of nearly $45,000.
The courts upheld a city ordinance that forbade sale of beer in basements.
Fifteen family housing units were assigned to STC.
Senator Young was instrumental in securing a priority order to permit STC East Hall construction to continue.
The city council requested funds for development of the Baldhill reservoir. The city was to furnish $208,000 along with other communities in the flood area and there would be $800,000 in federal funds.
George Hanna, Valley City school superintendent 27 years, announced retirement.
C. N. McGillivray announced sale of City Drug to William E. Brown, Jamestown.
A trainload of 150 were brought to the city after spending a night and day in a stalled Pullman section at Peak February 8 and 9.
The Times Record was selected to print the new telephone directory to which a new classified section was added. New typefaces were purchased for the project.
J. J. Schmitz retired from the hardware business, selling the store to George Fogarty.
Gerry Sparrow defended the Times Record policy by stating that all names were listed in court reports.
Over six tons of old clothing gathered in a Victory Drive were shipped from Valley City.
A school bond issue of $356,000 failed to get a two thirds majority by 19 votes.
Roy Sheppard bought an interest in Valley Appliance and became manager of the Ben Pfusch business.
Father J. G. Sailer, who had served St. Catherine’s when the church was built in 1905, died in Hankinson.
Olson Bros, Argusville, were the first to bring stock to the 1946 Winter Show. Although roads were blocked in many sections, the Winter Show Futurity was acclaimed. About one third of the farmers entered were unable to travel here. KSTP radio stars were entertainers at the show. A record $3,000 was paid for a Hereford female. Total sales were $60,000.
James W. Nielson sold his abstract business to BC Abstract, T. S. Henry, president.
Nearly 300 veterans were at the Homecoming Banquet sponsored by the American Legion.
Donald spenningsby was the first to get a private flying license from the Les Elliot Bob Miller School.
Thor and J. P. Baarstad, twins, marked 85th birthdays.
Ronald Maier purchased a hangar at the airport from Dean Kiser and operated a plane service station.
Vernon Krogh opened Club 21.
The Getchell printing shop was sold to three Minnesota men.
Dr. Merle S. Ward was appointed Valley City school superintendent. He had been principal here 1920-1932.
Alderman John Skretting resigned at the age of 82. He had first served on the council in 1897.
Dr. Eugene H. Kleinpell, STC president since 1942 resigned.
Valley City’s largest housing project to date, costing $94,000 was constructed at the corner of Front and Elm Streets and would house 17 families.
Thomas C. Hutchinson, Civic Club secretary, resigned after three years of service.
Voters rejected a bond issue for a new school for the second time.
John Carlisle purchased the J. Gordon McCucheon Texaco distributorship.
Dr. Paul Cook won the Barnes County golf tournament against 39 golfers.
The Penney’s store, John Yepson, manager added basement departments.
Charles Rudolph, Jamestown purchased Raveling Service Station.
Dr. R. L. Lokken was named STC president.
George W. Mason, city native was president of the Automobile Manufacturers Association.
Funds for a municipal swimming pool were approved by voters.
An iron lung was purchased with subscribed funds and $1,600 from the Eagles.
Milton Diamond announced he would open a furniture store in the City.
Mary Long had infantile paralysis, a student of STC. She was transferred to Fargo for Sister Kenney treatment.
S. T. Sorenson took over management of the Rudolf Café.
Carl Manstom was elected president of the newly formed Sheyenne Hospital Association.
The Zero Locker Plant was opened by Frank Luessen and Walter Jensen.
William S. Stutsman, Dickinson was named civic club secretary.
Henry Langemo began operation of a service station near Rudolf Hotel.
Closed three weeks for redecoration, the Rex Theatre opened with “Danny Boy.”
An Army Navy Store was opened in the Simonson block by Milton Diamond.
Rudy Kent opened a photographic studio on Main Street.
Stanley Miller opened a grocery store in a new building near City Park.
Nearly 100 nurses registered here for the convention of the N. D. Nurses Association.
Expansion plans were announced for Valley manufacturing Company, maker of plastic items.
Dakota Fiber Company leased a city building for planned operations.
Ole the Hermit confessed he had more wood carving work than he could handle.
A Culligan Water Service opened in the city.
The Wilberg packer drill, invented in 1904 by Henry Wilbert, now of Valley City was becoming world famous.
The city was to have a new bus depot and hotel, Mac McGibbon, Kindred proprietor for the Char-Mac announced building plans.
Additional buildings were readied for the 1947 Winter Show.
George Craven was S & L manager, succeeding Harley Dahl, who was transferred to Minot.
Jake Smith became the owner of Smith Lumber.

1945

1945
Ernest Fritch asked for help in disposing of a big onion crop. He had 2,000 pounds of Bermudas.
The city was number one in North Dakota fire prevention for a 14th consecutive year.
A blaze was discovered near the top of Occident elevator and controlled with minor damage.
Mary Carlton of the police department urged restricting beer parlors to street level quarters.
A new library for STC was rejected by the state board.
A new floor was poured in the Piller building occupied by North American Creameries ice cream store.
City restaurant owners feared closing unless ration points were adjusted.
The Strong-Ward café was purchased by John Smith, formerly of Rogers.
I.H. Anderson was elected civic club president.
A “meatless “day was designated at restaurants here.
Ernest Vogel opened Ernie’s Café in the Carlson Bros. building.
A midnight curfew was imposed for an all bars and dance halls.
The Mercy Hospital benefit drive netted over $13,000.
The office of Defense Transportation approved a livestock sale in lieu of the Winter Show here.
The Lucca 78 voice choir performed in a city concert.
“Winter Show Weather” and the livestock sale brightened outlook for the 1946 show.
VCHS defeated Jamestown, Bismarck, and Minot to take the North Dakota basketball title. Al Larvick was the coach. The state title was the first in 16 years.
It was expected that 10,000 out of state laborers would come for harvest work.
The STC V-12 program was absorbed by a naval reserve group.
Army engineers conducted a meeting here on the proposed Baldhill Dam.
The new Ben Franklin store had a grand opening. W. M. Stratman was the owner.
Harry Truman became president.
The city opened a three day “war on rats” by placing poison bait.
Meldahl’s Firestone Store had a grand re opening after expansion.
Chairman Herman Stern asked for “a barrage of advertising” to back the seventh War Loan. A discussion and display of post war products attracted a large city crowd.
Germany surrendered unconditionally and May 8 was observed a V-E Day.
Dr. W. C. Zwick, formerly of Litchville, opened a dentist’s office here.
T. X. Calnan, dean of county agents in agriculture, died at 57.
The Rudolf Hotel, under one ownership for 38 years was sold by the Giselius family to O. W. Fode, Jamestown.
N. W. Nielson asked that 5th Avenue be made a through street.
Al Larvick was named supervisor for a coordinated recreation effort in the city. STC Athletic Director C. V. Money said parent cooperation would be needed.
Plans were announced by G. A. Forthun-Steidel, to open a plastic plant on Main Street. He said 12,000 pencils would be made daily.
A grocer-consumer anti-inflation campaign opened in the city.
Interest was shown in a plan for veterans to re-locate in Valley City. Arnold Sandness was chairman of a war veterans committee.
Grand opening of the Farm and Home store was sponsored. Erve Schmidt was manager, Mike conlon, and assistant, of the Coghlan-Schmidt firm.
Bob “Rusty” Miller opened his bakery in a new location on Fifth Avenue.
Valley City pointed the way with contributions to build a $75,000 Wilderness Camp for Boy Scouts.
Ben Pfusch was named governor of the National Electric Retail Association Region 9.
Gerrie Sparrow joined the Times Record Staff.
R. O. Miller told of growth of the bread slicer he had invented to an extent where 100,000 were sold.
The Kindred building was purchased by Straus. A new structure was planned.
The Eagles opened their new ballroom.
4-H King Dick Hansen reigned at the Corn and Lamb Show.
Work on Baldhill Dam was to start early in 1946.
A three day 4-H show opened in the city.
Thilda and Lena Vangstad, STC faculty members, learned that twins make news.
The American Legion announced plans for a $60,000 hall.
The 164th Infantry marked the third anniversary of Guadalcanal landing.
A charter was presented to the new Lions club October 23, 1945. Casper Brainard was the first president.
The city council ruled that basement beer parlors would be forbidden after December 31, 1945.
Riverside Grocery and O. T.. Sando’s Grocery opened in the city.
Don Matchan headed a state Missouri Valley Authority group.
The F. W. Matz building was sold to George Toring for $5,500. A new structure was planned.
An upsurge in flying interest was seen by Les Elliott after a hangar was built at the city airport.
Enrollment of 64 seamen increased STC to 533.
O’Dell Amundson was assigned to foreign duty for the Red Cross.
Valley City Cold Storage, operated by C. M. Hetland had grown steadily in its first year. Addition of 1,000 locker units was planned.
John D. Haverstock bought controlling interest in Valley Motor Implement Company.
Extensive improvements were planned by the new owners of Rudolf Hotel.
Russell Widdifield was named county agent to take over work after T. X. Calnan’s death.
A series of benefit dances for war veterans were stage at Tait’s barn.
Russ Bignall opened a lumber business in the city.
FHA representative C. A. Jenkins said the city’s expansion possibilities were the greatest in the state.
M. K. Ulmen built a Case equipment plant on Main Street near Harrington livestock yard.
The city council discussed means of financing a swimming pool.
Japan surrendered unconditionally August 14, 1945.
Coghlan-Schmidt announced opening of a new hardware store on Main Street.
Valley City sponsored a V_J parade with V-12 trainees at STC in the lead. V-j night in the city was one of wild joy, but no rowdyism.
A bid of $204,268 for airport work was low. The offer was by McGarry Bros., St. Cloud, Minnesota.
There were 185 job opportunities in Valley City.
A farmers-merchants picnic was held in the city in September.
A wildlife chapter was organized at a meeting at the K P hall.
D. S. Ritchie was elected chairman of a North Dakota Wildlife Federation.
Dr. G. Christianson, Sharon, joined Dr. Paul Cook in practice.
Howard Brier, Devils Lake, purchased the Rudolf Hotel.
The Winter show group purchased the Chautauqua building which was to be moved to Winter show property, 2 nd street NE. It was to serve the purpose of the new Winter Show building.
Daily milk deliveries in the city would be inaugurated, said Roy Bryngelson, Barnes County cooperative Creamery manager.
The Rev. Thomas Nugent and his wife were feted on the 25th anniversary of his Congregational Church pastorate.

1944

1944
Jaycees painted parking stripes on streets.
Dr. F. L. Wicks headed North Dakota’s medical group.
City officials outline a $3,000,000 plan for post war projects at a meeting in Fargo. Projects included a swimming pool, airport expansion, Winter Show and sports buildings, water main extensions, change in steam heating, a Sheyenne River bridge and support forBaldhill Dam.
A Navy V-12 unit band of STC marched in the Memorial Day parade.
The P & O Market moved from Main Street to quarters near the Fair Store.
In observance of the invasion of Europe, stores in the city closed for one hour for special prayers.
Mercy Hospital benefit fund drive was aided by communities throughout the area.
An extensive youth program to combat juvenile delinquency was underway in the city. Gary Jones directed efforts.
Stock was being sold to finance a proposed $250,000 Land O’Lakes expansion project here.
Roy Feltman, a rigger on the Hi-Line Bridge, fell 75 feet from a painting scaffold. His condition showed improvement at Mercy Hospital.
R. L. Brown purchased the Anderson Funeral Home.
County commissioners voted a half mill levy for the Winter Show fund.
Mayor Curtis Olson proclaimed a city holiday when the Germans surrendered. The proclamation was issued August 31, 1944.
City dealers had 1,000 boxes of shells to sell to an estimated 2,000 hunters.
Demobilization plans for the army were studied as victory in Europe seemed near.
Henning Olson, Grand Forks, established an upholstery shop here.
Times Record and Barnes County News were consolidated, purchased by Valle City businessmen, who in turn sold the publication to Don Matchan October 1.
4-H members could swing the vote for a Winter show building, said A. J. Dexter, N. P. Extension agent.
Pheasants were sent to city Elks in armed forces this country as Christmas gifts.
Land O’Lakes broke ground for its $250,000 processing plant here.
Authority to levy a one-quarter mill levy for the Winter Show was approved in the November election.
Fred Aandahl was elected governor of North Dakota.
Ben Grotte was appointed chairman of the area ware price and ration board.
A “gentleman bandit” robbed the Gamble- Robinson plant and stole a car in the city to make his getaway.
Hjalmar Holt was elected president of the N. D. Hotel Association.
Valley City mobilized a “third army” to put over the Sixth War Loan drive.
Mercy Hospital’s benefit drive reach $12,000.
Tome Calnan won national acclaim for extension work.
Baldhill Dam was approved in Congress with an appropriation of $810,000, Fred Fredrickson informed city officials.
Freeman Anderson purchased the McGillivray apartment House.
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Clark marked their 65th anniversary in the city.
William Krause purchased Anderson Furniture and Funeral Home.
King Ludwig’s Bavarian throne was on display in the armory during a War Bond campaign.
Breeders Association donated $500 toward construction of a Winter show livestock building.
“A” card gasoline ration value was cut from three to two gallons.
Curtis Olson was acting mayor. Fred Fredrickson resigned after 14 years.
William Pearce resumed law practice here after resigning as an assistant attorney general.
The County War Bond goal was $640,000.
Jaycees selected George Golz, chief engineer at Municipal Utilities, as outstanding young man.
Ken Coghlan added a furniture department to the Coast to Coast Store.
New cold storage lockers were to be installed at the Farms of the North Produce company on Front Street.
Every person was asked to pledge “clean your plate” to avoid waste of food.
Ken Coghlan was elected Civic Club president.
The Hoosier Hot Shots were booked for Winter Show.
Nearly $22,000 in dividends was paid to 329 patrons of Barnes County Co-op Creamery.
The city subscribed over $300,000 in its War Bond quota.
Robert Ingstad purchased Radio KOVC.
Curtis Olson was elected city mayor.
Wears opened a mail order store in the city.
Early buying of coal for the winter was urged.
OPA dropped some vegetables, including spinach from rationing.
The City attracted national attention by business. Increase. T. C. Hutchinson, Civic club secretary, said bank debits were 130 percent above those of a similar quarter in 1942.
W. J. McGibbon purchased the Kindred Hotel from F. W. Hart.1944
Jaycees painted parking stripes on streets.
Dr. F. L. Wicks headed North Dakota’s medical group.
City officials outline a $3,000,000 plan for post war projects at a meeting in Fargo. Projects included a swimming pool, airport expansion, Winter Show and sports buildings, water main extensions, change in steam heating, a Sheyenne River bridge and support forBaldhill Dam.
A Navy V-12 unit band of STC marched in the Memorial Day parade.
The P & O Market moved from Main Street to quarters near the Fair Store.
In observance of the invasion of Europe, stores in the city closed for one hour for special prayers.
Mercy Hospital benefit fund drive was aided by communities throughout the area.
An extensive youth program to combat juvenile delinquency was underway in the city. Gary Jones directed efforts.
Stock was being sold to finance a proposed $250,000 Land O’Lakes expansion project here.
Roy Feltman, a rigger on the Hi-Line Bridge, fell 75 feet from a painting scaffold. His condition showed improvement at Mercy Hospital.
R. L. Brown purchased the Anderson Funeral Home.
County commissioners voted a half mill levy for the Winter Show fund.
Mayor Curtis Olson proclaimed a city holiday when the Germans surrendered. The proclamation was issued August 31, 1944.
City dealers had 1,000 boxes of shells to sell to an estimated 2,000 hunters.
Demobilization plans for the army were studied as victory in Europe seemed near.
Henning Olson, Grand Forks, established an upholstery shop here.
Times Record and Barnes County News were consolidated, purchased by Valle City businessmen, who in turn sold the publication to Don Matchan October 1.
4-H members could swing the vote for a Winter show building, said A. J. Dexter, N. P. Extension agent.
Pheasants were sent to city Elks in armed forces this country as Christmas gifts.
Land O’Lakes broke ground for its $250,000 processing plant here.
Authority to levy a one-quarter mill levy for the Winter Show was approved in the November election.
Fred Aandahl was elected governor of North Dakota.
Ben Grotte was appointed chairman of the area ware price and ration board.
A “gentleman bandit” robbed the Gamble- Robinson plant and stole a car in the city to make his getaway.
Hjalmar Holt was elected president of the N. D. Hotel Association.
Valley City mobilized a “third army” to put over the Sixth War Loan drive.
Mercy Hospital’s benefit drive reach $12,000.
Tome Calnan won national acclaim for extension work.
Baldhill Dam was approved in Congress with an appropriation of $810,000, Fred Fredrickson informed city officials.
Freeman Anderson purchased the McGillivray apartment House.
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Clark marked their 65th anniversary in the city.
William Krause purchased Anderson Furniture and Funeral Home.
King Ludwig’s Bavarian throne was on display in the armory during a War Bond campaign.
Breeders Association donated $500 toward construction of a Winter show livestock building.
“A” card gasoline ration value was cut from three to two gallons.
Curtis Olson was acting mayor. Fred Fredrickson resigned after 14 years.
William Pearce resumed law practice here after resigning as an assistant attorney general.
The County War Bond goal was $640,000.
Jaycees selected George Golz, chief engineer at Municipal Utilities, as outstanding young man.
Ken Coghlan added a furniture department to the Coast to Coast Store.
New cold storage lockers were to be installed at the Farms of the North Produce company on Front Street.
Every person was asked to pledge “clean your plate” to avoid waste of food.
Ken Coghlan was elected Civic Club president.
The Hoosier Hot Shots were booked for Winter Show.
Nearly $22,000 in dividends was paid to 329 patrons of Barnes County Co-op Creamery.
The city subscribed over $300,000 in its War Bond quota.
Robert Ingstad purchased Radio KOVC.
Curtis Olson was elected city mayor.
Wears opened a mail order store in the city.
Early buying of coal for the winter was urged.
OPA dropped some vegetables, including spinach from rationing.
The City attracted national attention by business. Increase. T. C. Hutchinson, Civic club secretary, said bank debits were 130 percent above those of a similar quarter in 1942.
W. J. McGibbon purchased the Kindred Hotel from F. W. Hart.

1943

1943
A new destroyer honored John Burke, Valley City, killed in the South Pacific.
Men 38 to 45 told to get war jobs or be drafted.
Jaycees named Carl Osen, Carpenter Lumber manager, outstanding young man.
Willard Carlson was elected Civic Club president.
Shoes were rationed beginning February 9. Rationing of canned fruits and vegetables were announced.
Record of the 164th at Guadalcanal was praised by Secretary of War Stimson.
WAAC’s were trained at state colleges.
Grocers protested the high point value on canned goods.
Price ceilings were set on eggs.
The city council urged approval of the proposed Baldhill Dam.
Harry Gilbertson sold Barnes county Implement to R. E. Blenn, Valley City and Fred Sahrowsky, Dickinson.
Influenza hit the community with 55 absent from high school.
A $250,000 grant to update the city airport was approved.
General Dwight Eisenhower was named invasion chief.
1943 grain production was highest in North Dakota history.
Esquire magazine was banned from mails.
Willard and Clarence Carlson sold their Main Street café after 25 years of operation to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Bulland. The Carlson brothers continued to operate a real estate office.
Dr. J. F. L. Bohnhoff, Trinity Church pastor for 48 years, died.
Six hundred soldiers from a tank detachment lead a military parade here. The event marked the close of harvest work done by troops. Detachments of troops had shocked 5, 910 acres of grain in on five day period.
A Japanese suicide submarine was display here when a $375,000 War Bond campaign got underway. Over 2, 500 persons viewed the sub.
Grocery “ceiling prices” were posted in stores.
A new curfew banned anyone under 15 years of age from city streets at 10 p.m.
The North Dakota Reclamation convention was held in the city.
Mayor Fredrickson was toastmaster at a banquet in Rudolph Hotel.
A special winter STC term was set from November 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944.
The city took over garbage collection January 1, 1943. The service had been contracted.
A five inch snowfall blanketed northern North Dakota.
June 4, William T. Craswell resigned as fire chief. Oscar Rood was his successor. Craswell had been a department member 44 years.
J. C. Penney spoke at a Rotary Club program here.
Veterans of Foreign Wars had their state convention in the city.
The state speed limit was reduced to 35 miles per hour. Speeders were denied rationed gasoline.
STC’s Navy V-12 program enrolled 233.
Oliver Peterson purchased the Holberg-Peterson Funeral Home on 5th Avenue.
Thomas Hatch was named secretary of the Civic Club.
Price ceilings were set on beef, veal, and lamb.
A $298,000 War Bond Drive began. City stores closed two hours as the campaign started.
Additional sugar was made available for home canning.
Purchase of an $18.75 bond would be sufficient for a soldier’s summer outfit.
A.M. Paulson had resigned as Civic Club secretary to take an OPA job in Fargo.
A city panel was named to mediate consumer and store complaints on price ceilings.
Valley City remained on state mandated Mountain Time as rural residents indicated preference.
Guns taken from a dead Japanese soldier were on display at the city war museum.
A 50 voice Community Chorus made its debut at the Winter Show. Arthur Froemke was director and Arthur Lydell, accompanist. “Swede Hearts’ and other NBC stars were on the final program.
Bulls and gilts brought a$33,810 at Winter Show Sales.
Butter was rationed.
Two pounds of steak or three pounds hamburger were permitted each week.
Over a foot of snow fell March 15 and 16.
Durwood Otterson and Gudrun Mikkelson were king and queen of 4-H entries during the Corn and Lamb Show.
Jams and jellies were rationed, would cost four to six points.
Out of town postage was raised from three to four cents.
Seven planes came to the city to boost CAP enrollment.
Charles Hetland Produce was sold to Farms of the North Marketing System.
Si Severson announced eggs would be broken and frozen and that 20,000 dozen eggs, one carload, would be shipped daily. Fifty girls were to be employed.
Townsend Clubs had their first state convention in the city.
Senator Gerald P. Nye was speaker.
One Hundred city business people signed for harvest work at 60 cents per hour.
Alden Anderson left R & G Auto Supply Company to form Dakota Auto Supply, operating from the basement of his home.

1943
A new destroyer honored John Burke, Valley City, killed in the South Pacific.
Men 38 to 45 told to get war jobs or be drafted.
Jaycees named Carl Osen, Carpenter Lumber manager, outstanding young man.
Willard Carlson was elected Civic Club president.
Shoes were rationed beginning February 9. Rationing of canned fruits and vegetables were announced.
Record of the 164th at Guadalcanal was praised by Secretary of War Stimson.
WAAC’s were trained at state colleges.
Grocers protested the high point value on canned goods.
Price ceilings were set on eggs.
The city council urged approval of the proposed Baldhill Dam.
Harry Gilbertson sold Barnes county Implement to R. E. Blenn, Valley City and Fred Sahrowsky, Dickinson.
Influenza hit the community with 55 absent from high school.
A $250,000 grant to update the city airport was approved.
General Dwight Eisenhower was named invasion chief.
1943 grain production was highest in North Dakota history.
Esquire magazine was banned from mails.
Willard and Clarence Carlson sold their Main Street café after 25 years of operation to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Bulland. The Carlson brothers continued to operate a real estate office.
Dr. J. F. L. Bohnhoff, Trinity Church pastor for 48 years, died.
Six hundred soldiers from a tank detachment lead a military parade here. The event marked the close of harvest work done by troops. Detachments of troops had shocked 5, 910 acres of grain in on five day period.
A Japanese suicide submarine was display here when a $375,000 War Bond campaign got underway. Over 2, 500 persons viewed the sub.
Grocery “ceiling prices” were posted in stores.
A new curfew banned anyone under 15 years of age from city streets at 10 p.m.
The North Dakota Reclamation convention was held in the city.
Mayor Fredrickson was toastmaster at a banquet in Rudolph Hotel.
A special winter STC term was set from November 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944.
The city took over garbage collection January 1, 1943. The service had been contracted.
A five inch snowfall blanketed northern North Dakota.
June 4, William T. Craswell resigned as fire chief. Oscar Rood was his successor. Craswell had been a department member 44 years.
J. C. Penney spoke at a Rotary Club program here.
Veterans of Foreign Wars had their state convention in the city.
The state speed limit was reduced to 35 miles per hour. Speeders were denied rationed gasoline.
STC’s Navy V-12 program enrolled 233.
Oliver Peterson purchased the Holberg-Peterson Funeral Home on 5th Avenue.
Thomas Hatch was named secretary of the Civic Club.
Price ceilings were set on beef, veal, and lamb.
A $298,000 War Bond Drive began. City stores closed two hours as the campaign started.
Additional sugar was made available for home canning.
Purchase of an $18.75 bond would be sufficient for a soldier’s summer outfit.
A.M. Paulson had resigned as Civic Club secretary to take an OPA job in Fargo.
A city panel was named to mediate consumer and store complaints on price ceilings.
Valley City remained on state mandated Mountain Time as rural residents indicated preference.
Guns taken from a dead Japanese soldier were on display at the city war museum.
A 50 voice Community Chorus made its debut at the Winter Show. Arthur Froemke was director and Arthur Lydell, accompanist. “Swede Hearts’ and other NBC stars were on the final program.
Bulls and gilts brought a$33,810 at Winter Show Sales.
Butter was rationed.
Two pounds of steak or three pounds hamburger were permitted each week.
Over a foot of snow fell March 15 and 16.
Durwood Otterson and Gudrun Mikkelson were king and queen of 4-H entries during the Corn and Lamb Show.
Jams and jellies were rationed, would cost four to six points.
Out of town postage was raised from three to four cents.
Seven planes came to the city to boost CAP enrollment.
Charles Hetland Produce was sold to Farms of the North Marketing System.
Si Severson announced eggs would be broken and frozen and that 20,000 dozen eggs, one carload, would be shipped daily. Fifty girls were to be employed.
Townsend Clubs had their first state convention in the city.
Senator Gerald P. Nye was speaker.
One Hundred city business people signed for harvest work at 60 cents per hour.
Alden Anderson left R & G Auto Supply Company to form Dakota Auto Supply, operating from the basement of his home.